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If you’ve read ANYTHING about cryptocurrencies and ICOs (Initial Coin/Token Offerings), you’ve read opinions from people who believe that the value of these coins will go up 100 times and others who believe that they will all crash to zero because there is “nothing there”.  If you believe either of these groups, you’ll be in big trouble if you’re an entrepreneur or angel/venture capital investor in this space.  Some cryptocurrencies will indeed go to zero and others will likely rise by 100X, but out of thousands of deals, how would you know how to pick the right ones?

It’s not just cryptocurrencies that have a lot of uncertainty today.  We’re seeing unprecedented change in blockchain, artificial intelligence, Internet of Things, self-driving cars and more.  These trends are all going to become a big part of our future, but which companies are the ones we should invest in?

Experience can be a guide in helping decipher the trends in fast breaking industries. The cryptocurrency ICO market reminds me a lot of all the dot.com startups in the 1990’s who were going public without having much more than a URL like etoys.com, socks.com, pets.com, etc.

What happened during the .com boom?  Lots of companies got funded quickly and at valuations that didn’t make sense.  It kind of looks like the ICO boom now.  When companies get too much money too quickly, they tend to accelerate their failure rate because they haven’t figured out their product-market-fit or how to scale up quickly.  We’ll certainly see some of that in the current ICO boom, but, just like in the .com boom, we’ll also see some VERY BIG winners. Google and Amazon looked crazy in the 1990’s  but now they are today’s biggest companies.  We will see the same thing with blockchain, cryptocurrencies, AI, IoT, intelligent cars and more.

The people who predict wholesale failure or wholesale success are bound to be wrong.  The people who are diligent in digging into who the winners and losers will be with a futurist attitude will succeed.  Investors who think like the hockey player Wayne Gretzky who famously said “A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be.” 

Great venture capital investors have to be like great hockey players and invest where the market is going to be.

Predicting the future is hard, but we’ve got some help for you.  The upcoming Angel Capital Summit, produced by the Rockies Venture Club will be focusing on Funding the Next Wave of Innovation.  We’ll be interviewing CEOs of companies that have gone through major trends in social networks, cyber security and more in order to learn how to identify and ride the trends.

The Angel Capital Summit will also feature 16+ companies that are riding the trends of their industries, pitching to angel and venture capital investors.  The event is open to the public and is free for RVC Keystone and Active Investor Members.  (If you’re not a member yet, click HERE for more information).

The Rockies Venture Club is the oldest angel investing group in the U.S. and is a non-profit organization focusing on furthering economic development by educating and connecting angel investors and great startups.

It seems like a majority of pre-Series A deals are done with convertible debt these days and I’d like to point out a few reasons why this is a bad thing for entrepreneurs and investors alike.

Just to get definitions out of the way, we’re talking about the decision to raise funding for startups by either equity investment in stock of a company, or in a convertible debt instrument.  Equity is pretty straightforward – invest money, get stock.  Convertible notes, on the other hand are not widely known to those outside of startup investing.  Convertible debt works like regular debt in that there’s a promissory note and an interest rate.  The interest is rarely paid in cash for convertible notes though, and it’s usually rolled into equity when the note converts into equity.  There are usually a few “triggers” for h

RVC Convertible debt vs. equity

aving the note convert to equity, but the most prominent one is that there is a “qualified financing round” which is usually around $1 million.  The idea is that the professional investors at that stage know how to value the business and set the terms. The first early investors who invest will convert at the terms set by the VCs, but usually with a 20% discount in price to compensate for investing earlier.  Convertible notes today also have a “valuation cap” which is equal to what the equity valuation would have been if the deal had been a stock transaction in the first place.  So, when the qualified round causes the note to convert, it converts at the lower of the 20% discount or the valuation cap.

Ten Reasons to Avoid Convertible Debt

Reason 1:  Convertible Notes do not qualify for Section 1202 QSBS Tax Breaks<a href="http://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/business">Business vector created by Dooder - Freepik.com</a>

Angel investors get a 100% capital gains tax break if they invest in equity in early stage companies that meet certain criteria such as being a C Corp., being under five years old, under five million in revenue and they hold the 

 

 

 

investment for five years.  Convertible notes don’t qualify for this tax break, so if all things were equal, the investor makes 20% LESS on convertible note deals since they have to pay capital gains tax on the investment, whereas investors who invest in equity do not have to pay any tax at all.

Reason 2: Equity is cheaper than convertible debt

You may have heard that it’s cheaper, faster and easier to do a convertible note, but the fact is that convertible notes are going to end up costing the company approximately 25% MORE than an equity deal.  The reason for this is that when the note converts, then it converts into EQUITY.  That means that the company pays twice for the legal: once to do the note and another time to do the equity.  So if a convertible note cost $2500 in legal fees and the equity deal cost $10,000, then the convertible note all-in is going to cost the company $12,500.  Why not just do it right in the first place and put all that money to work for the company?

Reason 3) 80% of Angel Investors Prefer Equity

If you’re selling something to a customer, wouldn’t you want to sell them what they want and not some more expensive and inferior product?  The American Angel Survey shows that investors prefer equity and I suspect that if the remaining 20% of angels read this blog, they’d prefer equity too.

Reason 4) You can lose your company if you default on a convertible note

When you take out the note you’re confident that you’ll have a qualifying follow-on round within 18 months, but many times it takes longer and the note comes due and payable and you’ve already spent the money and can’t raise any more.  You’re in default and investors can take your company from you.  Most investors don’t want to do that, but why go through the heartburn and stress of facing the potential loss?

Reason 5) Investors have to pay tax on interest they earned but never got

As interest accrues on convertible notes, interest is due.  Investors need to pay tax on those notes, even though they didn’t actually get the interest in cash.  So, if someone invests $100,000 in an 8% convertible note, they have to pay $2640 in cash to the IRS on that income.  Nobody likes paying taxes on money they never got and also, BTW, there is no tax due for equity investments.

Reason 6)  You have to come up with a valuation for convertible notes just like equity.

Many people think that using convertible notes lets them “kick the valuation can down the road.”  Nothing could be farther from the truth.  Every convertible note has a provision called the “valuation cap.”    The formula for calculating the valuation cap is as follows:

Valuation Cap = Equity Valuation

This means that when someone invests in a convertible note, they should never have to pay more than what the company is worth today.  If the valuation cap were higher than equity valuation, that would mean that note investors would have to pay more than the value of the company.  Just because it may convert at a higher valuation some time in the future does not mitigate the risks that the early stage investor has today.  In fact, the only way that the higher valuation comes about in the future is that the angel investor puts in the capital early, when risk is highest, so it doesn’t make sense that they should pay more than what the company is worth.

Many companies get confused about this.  One company told us that the valuation would be $5 million, but it would be $7 million valuation cap “because it’s going to convert at $12 million some day.”   It’s crazy to think that somehow using a convertible note makes a company worth $2 million more than one that uses equity. This kind of thinking makes no sense and hurts the startup community.

Putting valuations on early stage companies is something that is done every day and there’s no magic to it.  Seed Funds and Angel Groups have well established valuation methodologies that work well on pre-revenue companies.

Reason 8) Entrepreneurs get diluted with convertible notes

Entrepreneurs should be cautious about the cumulative dilution that paying interest which will be rolled into equity will create.  The longer the note goes on, the more startups will be diluted with the interest that they have to pay in the form of equity.  It would be better to preserve that equity for future growth.  Founders who chose equity over convertible debt don’t have to worry about interest accumulating and diluting their shares.

Reason 9) Equity creates better alignment between investors and founders

When convertible debt is used, there is a misalignment between investors and entrepreneurs.  Founders want to use high valuation caps or worse, no valuation caps, and prolong the amount of time before conversion, so that investors get the short end of the stick.  Some founders openly state that they want to use convertible debt to preserve their equity.  Those are founders that every investor should avoid – not because they want to build a strategy that preserves equity, but that they want to create unfair terms that preserve equity at the expense of investors.

Reason 10) Equity deals have all the terms defined

With a convertible debt deal, the conversion price is negotiated, but all the other terms which are extremely important to the relationship between the founders and investors are left open.  This represents a risk to investors and also leaves many matters unsettled.  One example is that there are usually terms about board representation which are not found in convertible notes.  Investors in early stage companies can offer much more to companies than just a check if they can serve on boards and help move the company along.  While there’s nothing to say that companies with convertible notes can’t have boards, in fact many don’t and that’s bad for both investors and entrepreneurs.

Last Words:

With all that being said against convertible notes, they can still be useful for the FFF rounds with friends and family who don’t know how to value a deal and who are investing primarily to support the entrepreneur.  Convertible notes can be better than some of the amateurish deals that get put together for early family investors who are often non-accredited that can make follow-on investments difficult or even impossible for the company, thus limiting its chances for success.

Visit www.rockiesventureclub.org to learn more.

 

Peter Adams

Managing Director, Rockies Venture Fund I, LP
Executive Director, Rockies Venture Club, Inc.
 Buy Venture Capital For Dummies on Amazon

 

Rockies Venture Club

Rockies Venture Club Post-Funding Strategies

After the first angel or VC funding round closes and the checks are cashed, most startups go through a transformation, like from a caterpillar to a butterfly, that makes them fundamentally different than a pre-funding company.  CEOs who fail to realize the changes that need to happen will end up facing challenges they did not expect.

Here are a few changes that need to take place after funding:

  1. Create a budget.

    No – not your proforma with all the optimistic sales projections – this should be a budget with numbers you can commit to.  Many companies feel like having a million dollars in the bank is an unlimited blank check to buy fancy new furniture or hire a dozen new employees. But all those things drain cash faster than you think and having a written plan for minimizing your burn rate and maximizing the runway to your next raise (or hitting break-even) is going to be an important part of your success.  Running out of cash before you hit the milestones needed for the next raise is a death sentence for your startup.

  2. Update the Professionals that Serve Your Business.

    If you’ve had your Aunt Bertha doing your books, it’s probably time to upgrade to a CPA who can provide you with the advice you need to keep from making mistakes.  A CPA is going to be important once you need audits as well.  Your legal team should now include several different legal specialties including securities, Patent and IP, and general business and contracts.  You probably got your legal house cleaned up in order to get funding and now is the time to get the right people on board to keep it that way.  Bankers, insurance, and other advisors are all going to be able to scale with you as you grow.

  3. Communicate with Investors.  

    Investors notice when you stop calling them after the check has cleared.  This is a bad thing for founders – especially those who are going to need to raise another round.  Future investors will contact first round investors during diligence and a good relationship is important – even more so if you hope to have follow-on rounds from your first funders.  Monthly reports including good and bad news, financials and metrics updates are a minimum.  It’s better to stay on top of the investor relationship and by communicating frequently, investors are more on-board with what’s happening.  Use a platform like Reportedly.co that allows you to see who has opened your messages and also allows investors to comment and offer help when needed.

  4. Balance Growth and Resources.

    You’ve been pitching your $100 million top line you expect in five years, but now it’s time to match your resources to your growth targets.  Grow too slowly and you’ll never raise another round (so you’d better hit break-even) and grow too fast and you’ll run out of cash before you hit the benchmarks for Series A and then game-over.  Perfect balance is what you need for venture success.

  5. Update your Exit Strategy (Goals and Contacts)  

    During your pitch everyone wanted to acquire you, but now it’s time to start executing on your Exit Strategy.  You should include the update in every board meeting and monthly update.  Start making contacts with those companies for whom you create value early on.  If they don’t know who you are, you’re not going to get the multiple offers you need for that 5X multiple you were lusting after.

  6. Metrics.

     Ok, you think you’re growing too fast to waste time on shit like metrics.  Fine – go ahead and be mediocre.  The best companies are crystal clear on what success looks like, how to measure it and what their goals are.  Without metrics, your team is mis-aligned, your investors are in the dark, and really – you haven’t got a clue about where you’re going.  You don’t have time not to do this.

  7. Strategic Plan

    It’s not set in stone, but without a roadmap you’re bound to get nowhere fast.  Companies without at least a lightweight two pager plan find themselves going through expensive pivots left and right to try to figure out what they could have done in the first place with a good planning process.  BTW, statistics say that after three pivots you’re out.

  8. Change from Tech Culture to Sales Culture.  

    So far, success has looked like getting your MVP launched.  You are three founders and a dog coding away in a basement somewhere, but now you need to change gears and become a sales and marketing company with a tech foundation.  Too many companies can’t get out of their tech roots and they keep on coding, but never figure out how to sell.  Break out of your comfort zone and start selling.

  9. Speed up.

     You’re on the clock now and capital is the most powerful accelerator out there.  You’ve got to code fast, sell fast, grow fast.  Companies that think they can continue on their old pace don’t get venture capital.  It’s a race against the clock with ROI multiples of 10X in five years, 25X in seven, there’s no time to waste and the slow starters won’t ever get to Series A.

  10. Investors are your partners.

     Now that the deal has closed, and all the negotiations are done, it’s time to tap into your investor base for help, connections and advice.  Keep them in the loop and engage them – they’re worth a lot more than just capital.

 

Good Luck

Post funding transformation is hard and unnatural for most founders.  Pay attention to your successful peers and remember that getting rounds of funding are not what this is all about – work towards creating a great, meaningful company with huge value for your exit partners!

 

 


Peter Adams is the Managing Director of the Rockies Venture Fund, Executive Director of Rockies Venture Club and Co-Author of Venture Capital for Dummies, John Wiley & Sons, August 2013.  Available at Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble and your local bookstore.

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