Investor Pitch Deck Series #4 – The Summary Slide

Dear reader,

This is the fourth of many blogposts in a series that I’m calling the Investor Pitch Deck Series. I am creating a post about each investor pitch slide, why it is important, the common errors, and how to communicate that you have what it takes to achieve your goals for this company. This is the fourth in the series and it’s about your final pitch deck slide. The Final slide, Fourth post, and it’s March. Get it?

Posts in this series

(note, this is NOT a suggested order for sides in your deck)

 


The mantra for this series is, “Above all, make sense.”


 

The Summary Slide

This is the slide you put last in your deck. Your final slide. The MOST important real-estate of your whole deck because it’s the first thing that your audience will see after you have completed your amazing pitch. Your audience just spent 5, 10, maybe even 20 minutes watching your mannerisms, hearing your voice, feeling your message, probably all for the first time. They are in a bit of a daze. Even if they zoned out during your pitch, when you beseech the audience for feedback, they tend to tune back in. With the single word, “questions?” lost audience members snap back to life.

Heads snap up, hearts feel guilty because they missed the last three slides. They might whisper to each other, “How much is he raising?” “Any patents?” “Did they say they were local?”

Your job is to answer those questions and keep them engaged during Q&A. I’ve seen two great ways to do this.

  1. You can create a summary slide with all the highlights of your deal including the ask, your patents, contact info, team info, major partnerships, or whatever makes your deal amazing.
  2. Or you can play a slideshow of your deal highlights that will play on behind you as you answer questions.

TrekPak, for their pitch at the Angel Capital Summit 2013, compiled their customer satisfaction into a beautiful slideshow. Each slide was a tweet from a real customer paired with a high resolution photo (provided by the customer) of the TrekPak hardware storage product in use. This simple slideshow acted as a 20-foot tall poignant declaration of success. The audience instantly understood that the company is selling their product. Customers are using the product and are happy enough to take pictures and tweet about it. That’s traction, my friends.

Cringe Factors

Cringe Factor #1 –  Your slide just says “Questions?”

Why this makes us cringe: This is a huge waste of a slide. You have a chance to grab the audience by the horns and engage with them in some valuable Q&A and you are trying to inspire them with the word “Questions?”. Yawn!

How to do it right: Inspire, engage, at the very least – inform. Choose something that you didn’t have time to convey in the pitch proper and really hit the audience over the head with it graphically. TrekPak knew that the two founders look young and it was important to convey their company’s traction. Another company might choose to focus on the powerful partnerships they’ve made, or to reiterate the strength of the team, or the pizazz of the marketing strategy.

Cringe Factor #2 – You’ve put only your contact information on your slide.

Why this makes us cringe: It’s better than the word “Questions”, but not much. Use your real estate!

How to do it right: If you want to keep it simple, create a static slide broken into 4 or 6 squares. Put the highlight information about your deal on that slide. Imagine the audience members lifting their phones in synchrony to take a picture of your final slide. This is the slide they can refer back to when they talk about your deal with other investors or their spouse later in the day. Your highlights are different than those of the company pitching before you so I can’t tell you exactly what goes on this slide. Intellectual property protection, sales to date, FDA approval, team years or experience, a photo of your product, the ask, other details about your deal, potential 5 yr ROI (be careful), your Fortune 500 mentor, time to break even. Spend an hour with your team to determine which are the most exciting parts of your company.

Cringe Factor #3 – You dash off the stage when no one attacks you with questions

Why this makes us cringe: You are missing whole minutes of opportunity to connect with the very people who can give you the resources your company desperately needs.

How to do it right: It’s the rare audience member that is squirming in their seat to ask a question. Audience members are listening, dozing off, complacent, and protected by the anonymity of being an audience member. They might be curious, but it takes a little time to form a question and raise a hand. Give them a minute. Count to ten in your head slowly. If they still haven’t come up with something, then have a question ready. Say, “I bet you are all wondering about our marketing plan. Here’s why we think it’s a strong plan.” I don’t care how blank their faces are. Keep sharing details about your company and your deal. Know your time limit for Q&A before you get on the stage – then use it all.

I searched the world wide internets and could not find a single example of an information-rich final slide. Having one seems like a BIG way you can stand out from all the other pitches at your next entrepreneur pitch event. Use the real estate!

I made this silly joke final slide to illustrate my point. My fake team is awesome, David Ducovney, Alicia Silverstone, Bill Clinton, and Bill Gates. What could do wrong? Haliburton has promised to acquire us in a few years and in the mean time, investors get free trips to Oahu for board meetings. Investors, you better make sure your stock contains voting rights so you need to be in those meetings!

 

 Article by Nicole Gravagna, PhD, Director of Operations for the Rockies Venture Club as part of a series on the elements of an investor pitch deck. The next in the series is The Problem Slide.

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  1. […] Article by Nicole Gravagna, PhD, Director of Operations for the Rockies Venture Club as part of a series on the elements of an investor pitch deck. The next in the series is  #4 – The Summary Slide […]

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  3. […] Article by Nicole Gravagna, PhD, Director of Operations for the Rockies Venture Club as part of a series on the elements of an investor pitch deck. The next in the series is  #4 – The Summary Slide […]

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