Peter Adams, Executive Director at Rockies Venture Club

Let’s tackle crowdfunding myth busting to better prepare for raising capital. What are the most commonly believed myths in crowdfunding? Here we look at crowdfunding as a quick fix.

Myth #6:

Once the SEC releases its guidelines, funding will become easy and freely available.

Reality:

Even if Crowdfunding portals do become popular, it will likely take years before people begin investing with them regularly. There are several factors that may slow the adoption:

Many “accredited investors” today do not even think of themselves as Angel Investors.  It is unlikely that the existence of a portal will change this perception. Accredited investors are individuals with a net worth of $1 million or more, not including their primary residence, nor an income of $200,000 or more a year with a reasonable expectation that it would continue. These investors are typically working with wealth advisers who are not motivated to move money to angel investments where there can be significant work in doing due diligence and risks with unknown investments. So, even though these people are qualified to make angel investments, few actually will engage in angel investing. It’s reasonable to assume that the same resistance to angel investing may exist among the non-accredited investors as well. While one upside of the JOBS act is that those who want to have the opportunity to experience the significant returns that angel investing can provide, it may take time for these individuals to get used to the idea of investing through a funding portal.

Platforms like E-Bay took years before people became used to the idea to bidding for things in an auction format.  People were simply not used to bidding for things and had concerns about whether they would actually receive the items they had won in an auction. It took E-Bay years to develop their buyer’s insurance program and for word to spread of the deals that could be had on their platform.

Even if Crowdfunding becomes as popular as E-Bay, it will take some time before it catches on in the mainstream. They will likely need to develop their own version of buyers’ insurance in order to gain investors trust.

 

 

1 reply
  1. Mike Clarke
    Mike Clarke says:

    Yes, unfortunately it will take a long time for significant investment to flow through crowd funding sources, even though the SEC permits it as a vehicle for equity investment. I am encouraged though that it will act as a way for angels investors to more easily and dynamically engage with projects they can identify with.

    It will be interesting to see how this movement will progress this year.

    Reply

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