Crowdfunding Myth Busting Series – Fraud

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Peter Adams, Executive Director at Rockies Venture Club

Let’s tackle crowdfunding myth busting to better prepare for raising capital. What are the most commonly believed myths in crowdfunding? Let’s look at many of them to find what’s truth and what to debunk. Here we ask if fraud is as concerning in crowdfunding as many believe. We’ll examine several more myths over the next week or two, so look for subsequent blog posts in the coming days.

Myth #2:

The SEC and others are concerned about the potential for fraud. It is a valid concern.

Reality:

We need to build in systems to prevent or minimize fraud, but fraud is the least of our concerns and will likely be a rarity. There is an even greater threat, however.  With unsophisticated entrepreneurs pitching deals to unsophisticated investors the opportunities for well-intentioned failure are enormous.
Funding Portals do not provide the vetting process that Angel Groups or Broker Dealers do, so unqualified companies will be on-line seeking funding. When unqualified investors invest in these sure-to-fail companies, everyone will be unhappy. There will be charges of fraud made, but in most cases the money will vanish due to poor strategy and mismanagement rather than fraud or intentional deception.

A majority of early stage companies are going to fail and the loss of money may look like fraud when the losses are due to other factors related to the operation of the business such as competitive pressures, regulatory changes, technological shifts, etc.  How are we going to be able to tell the difference when the time comes?

Just because money is lost does not mean that fraud has occurred.  If the company hired staff, developed product, and spent money on marketing, but never really took off, then that’s a simple company failure. If the company raised a first round and was depending on another round twelve months later that never was raised, then the company may have to shut down, even if its prospects were good. That’s not fraud either. There are dozens of scenarios where companies close – and in many cases shutting down sooner rather than later is the best option.

Investors need to be wary to protect themselves from fraud, but before they invest, they should be taking courses and workshops from groups like Rockies Venture Club in order to teach themselves about how companies are valued, how to identify risks, how to evaluate a deal and negotiate a winning term sheet.  Smart investors who invest with angel groups earn up to three times more on their portfolios than those who randomly point and click at crowdfunding offerings.

 

Stay tuned for the next crowdfunding myth busting blog post on negotiation being outdated…

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