Banking strategies for startups

Article by Bryant Burciaga, Guest Blogger

Essential tips for budding entrepreneurs seeking funding

Despite banks inability to enter into a Series A round of venture funding, banks can offer the essential “make or break” capital needed during the Series B or C rounds for many early stage companies. The Banking Strategies for Startups event that the Rockies Venture Club hosted on June 11th featured an array of banking professionals’ give insight into how entrepreneurs should strategize when forming a relationship with a bank.

The panel format event featured Charlie Kelly of Silicon Valley BankKen Fugate of Square 1 Bank, Adam Glick of Vectra Bank, and John Engleking of The Guppy Tank.

The four panelists offered an interesting diversity in banking backgrounds. Both Silicon Valley Bank and Square 1 Bank are considered Venture Banks, while Vectra Bank is a more traditional commercial bank, and Guppy Tank isan alternative lender that provides equity investments and loans for select entrepreneurs.

Ultimately the goal of obtaining financing starts by finding what type of bank serves your startup best. As such, the questions were posed: How does your bank serve entrepreneurs? And how are venture banks different from commercial banks? “Square 1 Bank serves entrepreneurs better than traditional banks because our bank is focused solely on offering services to entrepreneurs and venture capitalist that may not qualify for lines of credit or SBA loans,” said Fugate, founder and Senior Vice-President of Square 1. “While investors can also help, one day they want to invest in cloud service technology, another day something completely different, we have the ability to raise money when angel investors and VC’s can’t,” he added.

Adam Glick, now Vice President of Vectra Bank Colorado, used to work for Silicon Valley Bank and made sure to counter by mentioning that despite venture banks having the ability to make loans for receivables and equipment, they still oftentimes command an interest rate on top of stock purchase warrants securing their risk. “We can offer SBA loans with a variety of packages that offer benefits like extended repayment terms on the loan covenant, plus a traditional interest rate and we sometimes will ask for personal guarantees,” Glick said, noting that it might serve entrepreneurs better to have this type of structure in their financing instead of yet another source digging into small companies ownership of shares.

Jon Engleking of Guppy Tank offered a third alternative. “We are not government regulated, we are private, we have higher interest rates, and our average loan size is $100,000,” he said, “But we offer ‘Shark Tank’-like program where you can obtain money when you don’t qualify for all other sources of capital, so you go to the other guys first then come to us,” he added. With this selected by application only program, Guppy Tank receives on average 55 deals a month, taking in 15-20.

Finally, the panel discussion led to dialogue on how to form a relationship with a banker. Adam Glick gave the advice of knowing several bankers—well in advance of asking for funding—to ensure that at least one will be willing to work closely with you when the time comes. “I want to learn the most I can about a person, to properly have a strong relationship,” he said.

As final words of advice, Charlie Kelly vocalized having cash and receivables on a good standing to ensure no problems arise and to keep things running smoothly, and as a tip to always keep in mind the ability to give out more shares to investors, “When investors want more shares it benefits the founder so that ownership percentage isn’t diluted.” Ken Fugate’s final words of wisdom where stating that Square 1, “Doesn’t want to be the largest equity holder,” and supplemented that by adding “ please ensure that you can at the very least pay interest payments.”

Ultimately the final verdict of the night was that entrepreneurs should closely examine their options and figure out what direction will be most beneficial for their company growth.

For those seeking more information on debt structures and convertible debt come meet Jennifer Rosenthal and Carlos Cruz-Abrams, Business Attorneys at KKO law at the RVC Academy: Convertible Debt event on Thursday, June 20th from 5-7pm.
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  1. […] and CEO Darrin Ginsberg on the phone, and then catch up with COO Jon Engleking after he was on the Venture Banking panel hosted by Rockies Venture Club that […]

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