Many entrepreneurs and VCs alike are hesitant to produce a proforma for more than two years out into the future.  They claim that it’s impossible to know what will happen and that the third year and beyond are “just numbers.”   While I would agree that nobody expects a startup to perform according to its projections, I am heartily in disagreement with the claim that a five year proforma doesn’t tell us anything.

venture capital proforma

First of all, let me say that it’s totally ridiculous to think that even a two year proforma has some degree of accuracy.  The earliest launch dates are typically missed and the first two years are highly variable – perhaps even more variable than years three and beyond.  So, if you’re going to say that you can’t predict years three through five, I will counter that you might as well abandon the effort all together since nobody has a crystal ball that extends to two years, much less five.

Why do I want a proforma out to five years (or more)?

1)      I am focused on the EXIT.  I want to know clearly how you plan to get from Point A (where you are today) to Point B (your exit strategy).  I want to see how you think and how big you expect to grow.  If you’re only planning on growing to five million in sales, and that’s your best case scenario, then maybe I’m not interested in investing.  I want to know what you’re shooting for.

2)      I want to know if you can SCALE.  I see a lot of entrepreneurs who are good at running companies with up to twelve employees.  But there are relatively few who know how to grow a big company, develop partnerships, put systems and metrics into place and scale up BIG.  Your numbers will show me that you know what it takes to scale and the resources required to do it.  I recently reviewed a proforma for a company that projected $35 million in sales with three employees.  Even with outsourcing their manufacturing, it didn’t make sense.

3)      I want to know how you THINK.  Are you detail oriented and able to develop your numbers from the bottom up, or are you just taking a percent of your total projected sales?  Do you understand the factors that will impact your growth and the costs that will accelerate or decelerate growth?  Do you show a straight line growth curve or does it vary wildly from year to year?  Do you understand the common ratios for support staff, sales and management at each level of growth?  Even if you’ve got a disruptive strategy that operates more efficiently, I want to see that you know what the norms are and how your new methods will be more efficient.

4)      I want to know how you came up with your VALUATION.  I use five different valuation models when assessing investment in companies and three of them are based on your exit strategy and the exit value is typically going to be some multiple of sales or EBITDA.  I will adjust your sales figures to what I believe are realistic, but I also want to see how your valuation relates to your projected sales.  Are you picking a valuation out of the air or are you doing the work to research and find ratios that make sense?

5)      I want to know how long it will be before I get my MONEY BACK.  Are you planning on an early exit within two or three years, or does your strategy take five to seven, or is it eight or longer?  These numbers will be critical to my investment decision since I don’t want to be in deals that take longer than seven years to liquidity.  If you think it will take eight years, then it will probably take ten and I’m not going to be hitting my investment objectives.  I calculate my returns based on Internal Rate of Return which is a ratio of total return of capital over time, so the longer my capital is out, the lower my IRR.

So, if you’re pitching to a VC, it can be in your best interest to show all years projections between now and your exit – and most VCs are realistic in knowing that if you actually hit your numbers that it will be a miracle.

 

____________________________________________________________________________

Peter Adams is Executive Director of Rockies Venture Club and Co-Author of Venture Capital for Dummies (John Wiley and Sons, 2013)   Available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble and your local book store.

Venture Capital For Dummies

Why do we pitch so many companies?baseball-vc-pitch

I like to tell the story of the first time I filled out a questionnaire about Rockies Venture Club’s activities for the Angel Capital Association.  When I got the the question about how many companies we present each year, the choices were something like 1-3, 4-7, 8-10, 11-15, 16-20, 21-25, 25+ pitches per year.   With over 100 companies pitched in 2012 and 80 in 2013, we are off the charts!

I have a huge respect for the people I’ve met at the ACA, so I began to wonder whether we were doing something wrong.  I started looking at how the different angel groups functioned and why we were different.  Here is a summary of what I found:

1)      RVC is unique in that it serves the whole community and not just investors.   We have pitch events with 100+ people watching four pitches every month and conferences with hundreds of people watching 12 or 24 pitches.  We reach out to the community through partner groups.  If you just have a few dozen angels to depend on for your deal flow, then you won’t see a lot, but if you involve the whole community, then the deal-flow suddenly becomes significant.

2)      RVC is also unique in its focus on education.  By educating both the angel investors and the entrepreneurs, we make a smarter environment full of smart investors and savvy entrepreneurs.  This means that there are more high quality deals available than if no quality educational resources were available.  Without Pitch Academy we’ve noticed that most  (but not all) of the pitches we see are pretty flat.  They’re not only poor pitches, but the thinking behind them is often thin and poorly researched.  RVC workshops help entrepreneurs to build a solid logic to their plans, backed up by good research and hard work.  This alone is not enough to succeed, but it definitely raises the bar and puts higher quality deals in front of investors who now have the tools to really evaluate the deals that they’re looking at.

3)      You could challenge our plan to pitch roughly one in ten applicants.   “Why not just pick a few really good companies and go with them?”   There are a few problems with this challenge.  The first is that in many cases you don’t know which companies are good until you pitch them and get into due diligence.  If you just goody-pick the companies with great executive summaries all you get is companies that are good at executive summary writing.

4)      What about the 75% of RVC pitch companies who don’t get funded?  I’m often surprised about what does and what doesn’t get funded.  What I have seen is that something like two thirds of the companies that don’t get funded didn’t make it because they weren’t ready to pitch yet.  They still had homework to do in order to back up their plan and to refine their message and build a sharp strategy.  Some times these companies give up and other times they go back to the drawing board and come back six or twelve months later with a new CEO on board and the funding falls immediately into place.  Giving these companies the opportunity to pitch provides them with the perspective that they need to grow and get funded – or better yet, it teaches them how to bootstrap so that they never have to be beholden to angel or VC investors!

5)      Seeing lots of companies is the best way to build your 10,000 Malcolm Gladwell hours as an investor.  Some angel groups pitch only one company per month.  It would take one of those angels ten years to see as many deals as an RVC investor sees in a year.  Which investor do you think is going to have the ability to spot the winners from the losers?  Pattern recognition plays a big part in investing and the only way to build that is to see lots of deals.

6)      Enterpreneurs benefit by seeing lots of pitches too.  If entrepreneurs can see lots of great pitches, they get an idea for how high the bar has been set in our community.  They see what investors like and don’t like and they get to see which companies get funded and go on to do great things.  In many angel groups, the first pitch the entrepreneur sees is their own.  This is a bad way to learn how not just to pitch your company, but to build a winning strategy and team.

After thinking about it, my conclusion is that, like so many things, the best solution is to reach a balance.   It’s great to pitch a lot of companies for perspective, exposure and deal flow, but you also have to be prepared to limit the companies pitching to the ability of your entrepreneurial community to produce quality deal flow.    Right now we’re seeing 80 quality deals a year, but if things slow down, 60 might be the  right number, or if they heat up, then maybe 120!

To see a dozen great pitches – and I mean it – twelve highly investable companies – attend the 25th Rockies Venture Club Colorado Capital Conference.  #2013CCC   This even will have twelve great companies PLUS presentations from four Colorado companies that have gone big-time and had huge exits this year.  Hear from their founders and CEOs to learn how they did it and what to watch out for as either an investor or entrepreneur.

November 6-7 in Denver and Golden.  The 25th Colorado Capital Conference

Register for Investing In Tech Companies event

 

Practicing your pitch is one of the most important parts of presenting to a group of investors.  While some people can do a pitch with relatively little practice, no one can just wing it.  So how do you know when you’re ready to pitch and you’ve practiced enough?   Here are a few quick tips:

1)       Practice at least ten times before you pitch in front of someone else.  You should get to the point where you’re not having to think about what you’re saying – you have key phrases that you use every time.

2)      Time your pitches.  If you have more than ten seconds of variation between the pitches,  that means you’re making up new stuff each time.  Practice enough times that you can hit the same amount of time within ten seconds each time you present.

3)      Memorize your slide order.  If you have fifteen slides, you should be able to recite the titles of each of the slides in order.  This way when you’re on your “problem” slide, you’ll know that the next slide is your “solution” slide and you can transition smoothly and powerfully from one thought to the next.  Have someone quiz you for the complete order and starting at random slides so that you always know what is coming next.

4)      Be smooth even if you have distractions.  Use the TechStars method and have people throw wadded up balls of paper at you while you’re pitching.  Have someone unplug the projector and then practice dealing with that smoothly and without dropping a beat in your presentation.  Things often go wrong in a pitch, so be ready to roll with the punches.

If you do these things, your pitches will be more professional and confident and you will be better prepared to communicate your ideas most effectively to investors.

At the Esprit Entrepreneur Conference in Boulder this week a question was asked about how we can make Colorado more than a flyover state and attract more out of state investment.

Given that Boulder and Denver are in the top three cities for startups on a per-capital basis, it’s clear that we don’t have a problem with developing an entrepreneurial community  and the great high quality deal flow that comes from that.  I’m continually impressed with the ability of the Front Range ecosystem to turn out high quality companies.

But, if we want to attract more out of state investors, we need to have more Colorado exits that we can celebrate and make public.  This year has been a great year for Colorado exits with the IPOs from Noodles & Company and Rally Software.  Both companies have more than doubled since their IPOs and are doing great.  We’ve also had a number of great $100 million plus acquisitions including LineRate and NexGen Storage.

Colorado needs to get the word out more about these great exits.  We’re well known for startups, but investors know that without exits, there is no way to get their money back.  In short, exits are what investors care about.  When investors see that our community is sophisticated and is thinking about how to best position ourselves for exit, even if it is an acquisition by an out-of-state firm,  that there is a greater chance of attracting those coastal dollars to Colorado.

Rockies Venture Club is celebrating Colorado Exits with its 25th Colorado Capital Conference November 6th and 7th, 2013.  www.coloradocapitalconference.org  We will be hosting twelve great startups whose pitches will ALL include a description of their exit strategy so that investors know how they will get their investment back.  The theme of the conference is Steven Covey’s Second Habit of Highly Successful People – “Begin with the End in Mind.”

We will also have speakers from the top companies who have had exits this year who will tell us how they positioned themselves, how they decided on IPO vs. acquisition, and when they actively started the exit process.  The fact that the founders are still with the companies shows that an “exit” is really a liquidity event where money is returned to investors, not an actual exit where the founders leave a company.  This year’s CCC is a must-attend event for investors and entrepreneurs alike.

 

BizGirls CampEvery year Biz Girls gets better and better.  We’ve evolved from the first year’s amazement that the girls could actually complete the program and get their companies live within the tight time limits of the program to this year’s re-branding of the program from “Biz Girls Camp” to “Biz Girls CEO Development Program.”

While the Biz Girls CEO Development Program works on the same values and principles as the “camp”, we’ve raised the bar on what is expected of the girls – and interestingly – they have raised the bar on what is expected of us.  In response to this, we implemented three new parts of the program this year.  We couldn’t have done this without the volunteer effort of Louise Campbell-Blair, who joined us as Biz Girls’ CMO to get our marketing program in place, but who ended up doing much, much more.  The three new programs include a Mentorship program, advanced workshops and sponsorships to help with tuition, allowing us to achieve our diversity goals.

Mentorship Program:  Each girl is given the option to have a mentor who will work with them after the program has completed.  In the past we’ve had challenges with getting continuity and providing a way for the girls to continue their businesses on into the school year.  We’re hoping that by providing a mentor who can give advice, help set realistic goals and monitor progress, will improve the chances that these young companies will continue to grow and thrive well after the summer ends.

Advanced Sessions in Web Design, Pitch Development and SEO.  This year we brought in a number of experts who helped by offering afternoon programs on three of the program days with advanced sessions covering web design, pitch development and marketing the web sites.  The results were amazing.  The pitches this year were great and included full powerpoint presentations.  The web sites were much more sophisticated and filled out with graphics and logos, especially in Boulder where the girls decided in their strategic plan that developing logos was important to them.  And finally, the SEO worked better than anyone had expected with Rachel from casetaste.com getting her first order the day after the program ended!  Rachel ended up on a CBS TV program as a result of her success!

Finally, we added a program for donors to sponsor a Biz Girl.  This was a tremendous success as it allowed us to pursue our objectives for diversity and make sure that no girl was denied a spot in the program because of an inability to come up with the tuition.  Thanks so much to the generous individuals who supported these girls!

For those of you who haven’t been involved, here’s a summary of the companies that we formed this year:

Denver:

Casetaste.com
Denverdusting.com
Tealpoppies.com
Tenniscoachfinder.com
Upcyclethreads.com
Boulder:
Writerslam.com
Bocodesigns.com
hannimals.com
inspiralook.com
fandomcentral.com

RVC Academy – Due Diligence 

Register for Angel Capital Summit 2013

by Thought Leader: Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4

When: June 25, 5-7pm

Where: Shift Workspaces, 383 Corona Street, Denver

Investors,

  • Ask the right questions to uncover the risks that could jeopardize your investment.
  • Learn to devote a short 10-20 hours of due diligence and discover what you need to make a smart decision.

Entrepreneurs,

  • Empower your deal by gathering your due diligence materials before investors even ask for them.
  • Close your deal faster by supporting your lead investor.

Taught by Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4. CID4 is a not-for-profit organization committed to Economic Development Through Innovation Advancement in the life sciences industries, by providing investment capital and management assistance. Lauren also serves on a number of Advisory and Executive Boards for early stage companies.

 

 

From time to time a new ranking of the VC must-read blogs appears on the internet. During the research for this post I went through many of them, some based on the number of unique visits some others on the author´s quality scale or personal preferences. As it turns out, the first fifteen positions are always taken by the same guys.

In a world where internet has taken over and leadership claims to be global, it occurred to me to check the relationship between an active and prolific VC community (based on # of deals and $ invested) and the existence of VC thought leaders in that community.

California, Massachusetts, New York, Washington and Texas ranked in the top five positions in terms of venture capital invested based on the 2012 figures provided by the National Venture Capital Association (Colorado was 6th. Yay!). Let’s see who are the most relevant venture capital bloggers in these communities and what are they saying.

 

For the purposes of this post a state is considered a Community and blogger is a thought leader. In the VC world, bloggers aren’t just opinionated, they are professionals with years of experience.

1. California:

Eureka! We have found it, the world champion in Venture Capital based on number of deals and amount invested. Thus it doesn’t come as a surprise that it is also the winner for the number of relevant bloggers!

Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: August Capital

Blog: Venture Blog.

Area: Los Angeles

Firm: GRP Partners

Blog: Bothsidesofthetable

  • Paul Graham: Co-founder of the Y combinator and for many the “king” of bloggers. In his minimalist looking website you can find gripping essays (no blogposts) that won´t leave you indifferent, just check his last one on how to get startup ideas.
Area: Mountain View

Firm: Y Combinator

Blog: PaulGraham

  • Chris Dixon: Entrepreneur and investor with a moderate style. Dixon is considered a “greater explainer of trends” and so he does in hardware startups.
Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: Andreessen Horowitz.

Blog: CDixon

  • Ben Horowitz:  self declared a rap fanatic, Horowitz uses rap lyrics as prefaces of his blogs and doesn´t have a problem disclosing numbers and strategies. Check his last post on how to hire sales people.
Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: Andreessen Horowitz

Blog: ben´s blog

The list doesn´t finish here it goes on and on with other brilliant bloggers such as Bill Gurley or Dave Mcclure. So it seems the most VC active state has the most active and relevant bloggers.

 

2. Massachusetts:

Meanwhile on the opposite coast, Massachusetts emerges as the second VC power.

  • Rob Go, Lee Howe, David Beisel. These three VCs are the cofounders of Next View Ventures, but apart from sharing their company they also share a passion for blogging each one of them with a different style and point of view.
Area: Boston

Firm: Next View Ventures

Blog:  Rob Go, Lee Howe, David Beisel

Area: Boston

Firm: Volition Capital

Blog:  Thinking about Thinking.

 

3. New York:

With New York City as largest, richest and most influential regional economy in the United States, and Manhattan as the home to six major stock markets, venture capital is rapidly growing in this region.

  • Fred Wilson: The raising voice for the New York Tech Scene. Famous for his blog section MBA Mondays  with around 160 posts in MBA topics such as revenue models-gaming. His blog constitutes an enormous body of work and knowledge worth a deep dive in.
Area: New York

Firm: Union Square Ventures

Blog: AVC

Area: New York

Firm: Brooklyn Ventures

Blog: Thisisgoingtobebig.com

 

4. Washington State

Nobody stood up in the Seattle community until the 7th of October of last year, when the VC Greg Gottesman wrote his first blogpost.

  • Greg Gottesman:. The VC mixes personal opinions and experiences with business tips and life style advices in a looking promising blog.
Area: Seattle

Firm: Madrona

Blog: starkRavingVC.

 

5.Texas

“The exception that proves the rule?” With a GDP bigger than The Netherlands or South Korea Texas ranks the 15th economy in the world and the 5th state in VC investment… And there is nobody taking the lead out there in the bloggosphere… The more I think about the whys of this, the more my fingertips tingle for a new blogpost.

If you are reading this and you know of someone please let us know we will be happy to include a Texan blogger!

 

6. Colorado:

Yup! I know It´s out of the top 5 but…

  • Brad Feld: In a mix between personal and professional thoughts Brad Feld has gained the respect of the VC and entrepreneur community not only in Colorado but also worldwide. Prolific, eclectic and sometimes controversial FeldThoughts is full of articles worth your time. Check out his last post on Software patents.
Area: Boulder

Firm: Foundry Group

Blog: Feld Thoughts

 

In a nutshell, in California, Massachusetts, New York and Colorado  the equation seems to work and a high levels of investment are accompanied by well-know blog leaders spreading the word out. On the contrary, Texas and Washington don’t follow the pattern! Yes, on the internet area leadership is global, but to certain extent VC investments and communities are still local and so they are their know-how and customs. Texan and Washingtonian bloggers or bloggers-to-be raise your voice! We avid readers, entrepreneurs, innovators, angels and investors want to know and are waiting for you!

 

About the Author: Sara Rodriguez is the new Associate Director of the Rockies Venture Club. Please consider welcoming her and introducing yourself when you see her at RVC events. 

 

 

The Angel Capital Summit 2013 Semi-finals were closed to the public. Instead, we invited some energetic student entrepreneurs to view the pitches. We know it’s hard for students to break out of their rigid schedules and ivory towers so the few who actually showed up that day are total stars. Eric Nydegger from the School of Mines attended to our semi-finals with Dr. Joy Godesiabois who understands the importance of connecting industry and academia.

Impressed with some of the questions that Eric had for the pitching companies, I caught up with him between pitches and asked him a question of my own.

“Eric, will you write about your experience here today for our online readership?”

Below is his take on the busy day:

[pullquote align=”left|center|right” textalign=”left|center|right” width=”30%”] Investors will consider investing in a founder who is excited about the business[/pullquote]

As with any college experience it is necessary to get outside of the structured institution and peruse different venues for the application of education in the business environment. Recently the undergraduate and graduate students at the Colorado School of Mines in the economics and business department were provided this opportunity through an invitation to attend the Angel Capital Summit 2013 Semi-Finals to gain insight into the process of the entrepreneur pitch to angel investors.

By personally experiencing the Semi-Finals and watching the angel investor coaches and judges in action, I was able to see first-hand the mannerisms, presenting strategy, and the basics of the pitch required to gain the interest of investors effectively and succinctly.

After each pitch, judges inquired about details. From the business’ Twitter handle to the summary slide, I was quickly able to see what investors would be looking for within the first crucial seconds of the five-minute pitch and throughout the entire presentation. As efficient methods of communication of the business were addressed, the varying entrepreneurs and coaches were conducted through a quick presentation and then a Q&A session to address questions, but to also allow for the knowledgeable judges to provide guidance and recommendations for the entrepreneurs on their presentations.

Some of the presentation tips included using timeline slides when effective, addressing the exit strategy, clarifying the product and the industry in the first crucial moments of the presentation, addressing current partnerships and networks that are currently developed and advantageous to the business, and most importantly highlighting the competitive advantages.

Other guidelines for the presentation strategy included using pictures to keep interest without distracting, create “the hook” within the first 30 seconds, and present with power and enthusiasm for the business. Investors will consider investing in a founder who is excited about the business with a poor product before investing with an individual that has a great product but a poor, unenthusiastic attitude.

The atmosphere of the practice pitch session gave me an understanding of the pressure of the presentations and the composure required by the entrepreneurs in order to effectively communicate their business and product.  As a practice session and a final elimination session before presenting to the multitude of investors the following week, the setting brought on a challenge to the entrepreneurs presenting, recognizing the significance of the experience. By simply observing the professional poise of some and the shaking and bending of notecards by others, the preparation and the experience of the speakers quickly became apparent to all those observing.

Throughout the enlightening experience and in preparation for our own class presentations of our business plans it was most certainly an informative and educational experience to supplement the classroom experience. The familiarity to the situation will certainly prepare those that attended not only the pitch session but the conference as well with a new awareness and vision for the young entrepreneurs into the innovative business environment.

Part of the Rockies Venture Club mission is to help build the pipeline of great entrepreneurs in Colorado. We are excited to report that 6% of our Angel Capital Summit Attendees were students. The audience contained student representatives from the School of Mines, Regis, and CU Boulder.

 

Ed note: These classes have already occurred. Please contact nicole@rockiesventureclub.org to request a class to be run again.

RVC Academy – Seed Stage Investment Education

We have two high-quality classes on the calendar in the next two weeks as we prepare for the Angel Capital Summit.

 


Follow RVC Classes on Twitter #RVCacademy


Register for Angel Capital Summit 2013

Due Diligence (9 more seats have been added!)

by Thought Leader: Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4

When: Feb 25, 4-6pm

Where: Shift Workspaces, 383 Corona Street, Denver

Investors,

  • Ask the right questions to uncover the risks that could jeopardize your investment.
  • Learn to devote a short 10-20 hours of due diligence and discover what you need to make a smart decision.

Entrepreneurs,

  • Empower your deal by gathering your due diligence materials before investors even ask for them.
  • Close your deal faster by supporting your lead investor.

Taught by Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4. CID4 is a not-for-profit organization committed to Economic Development Through Innovation Advancement in the life sciences industries, by providing investment capital and management assistance. Lauren also serves on a number of Advisory and Executive Boards for early stage companies.

 


Vetting Exit StrategiesRegister for Angel Capital Summit 2013

by Thought Leader: Tom Caltrider, Managing Director, Corporate Development Capital, LLC

When: March 4, 9-11am

Where: Holland and Hart Office: 555 17th St #3200 Denver

Stephen Covey, in his very popular book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People gave as his second habit:

Begin with the End in Mind

Whether you are an angel investing in a new company or a founder who is pitching to angels, it is important to your personal net worth to figure out what the End or the Exit will be for this venture. Investors and Founders will enjoy an in depth discussion on exit strategies as they relate to companies that are seeking seed stage capital.

Successful angel deals result in a return on investment in 3-7 years. To get there, we need to begin with the end in mind.

This two hour Exit Planning session will discuss the following:

  • What is an exit?
  • What are your goals?
  • How to build an exit strategy?
  • Implementing the exit.

 

[Clarification Note: See bottom of post for FAQ about which RVC services require a fee.]

Pitching companies contact me all confused about having to pay for Pitch Academy before they pitch to investors. Another thing I get a lot of guff for is the fact that we require pitching companies to pay for their conference tickets at the Angel Capital Summit. I was told that for a pitching company to pay for the conference is like the band having to pay to attend their own show.

We have a provision where we’ll waive your fees if you pay us back with your time. For ten hours of volunteer work, you can get through our system entirely cash free. This is a community organization, we have plenty of work for volunteers. One word of warning, if you want to volunteer, you have to actually try to be helpful. Playing with your phone for hours while I handle the deluge of event attendees at the door, like one CEO that will remain nameless, is not really helpful. Understandably, founders often find that they are busy with their company and would rather just pay for the class.

Why are we gouging entrepreneurs with these horrible fees for a simple 5 minutes of air time?

[pullquote align=”right” textalign=”right” width=”30%”]At RVC we spend two days talking with investors about each company after the pitch.[/pullquote]

Wow, that really does sound bad, doesn’t it? The pitch is only the tip of the iceberg. The pitch is the public part, and from the outside it looks like all we do is pitch companies every month and take their hard earned cash.

Actually, we do a quite a bit more than that.

 

 

 

Reviews

By the time a company pitches with RVC, we’ve already had reviewers vetting their company and determining if they are ready for investment. It would be a huge disservice for us to pitch companies randomly, or just have them get in line and pitch when they wanted to. Readiness is a big deal and if we pitch a company too early, investors get the message that it’s not a good company (right or wrong). Our reviewers are experienced volunteers, but it takes hours of administrative staff time to sort, manage, and account for all the applications that come in to make sure that everyone gets fairly reviewed.

Pitch Academy

I’m really proud of this class that Peter has put together. Pitch Academy is a 4 hour class that is a drink-from-the-firehose lecture that encompasses everything we’ve learned about angels, pitching to angels, and most importantly pitching to our angels. We know who is investing right now and we know the messages that they want to hear. After the lecture, companies pitch in class and get constructive comments.

This class is always full even when we run an extra class in the month. People take Pitch Academy before they even apply to pitch just so they know what they are getting themselves into with angel investing.

Attending Pitch Academy used to be optional. We quickly learned that it was very important. Audience members were having no trouble at all picking out the company who had not come to pitch academy and we determined that it was a disservice to pitch a company without giving them some extensive feedback first. Even good pitches seem bad when they haven’t been standardized with the current trends.

After taking the Pitch Academy class, every pitch your company does will be better, sharper, and more focused on the investment deal. We teach investor-speak.

Investor Forum

Founders may not realize that at RVC we spend two days talking with investors about each company after the pitch. Both Peter and I manage 6 hours of investor meetings each month acting as each pitching company’s agent. We go over the pitch deck, discuss the points that investors want to learn more about, and get to the nitty gritty about what they need to move forward with due diligence. It’s important that this is done without the founder present. That anonymity gives investors a chance to talk candidly and determine what it would take for them to get involved with the deal.

RVC Investor Forum exists because of thousands of hours of investor community building done by RVC staff. We spend a lot of time working with angels to teach the skills of investing so they are educated when they approach you for negotiation. An educated angel is much easier to work with when you are closing a round.

Some have argued that instead of the entrepreneur paying fees, the angels should pay for these services. They do! We divide the costs between the entrepreneur and the angels.

Entrepreneurs think that angels are the haves and the founders are the have nots. Therefore angels should foot the bill for everything in this process. It’s important to understand that although a founder might need an angel to grow his business, an angel never needs a founder. Angels don’t have a mandate to invest like VCs do. Angel investing is a hobby, not a job, or a requirement. If we add all the fees to the angel side of the seasaw, they’ll just take their ball and go home. Nobody wants that.

Referrals

If your company needs a lot of money, it makes sense for you to share your deal with High Altitude Investors in Colorado Springs or Colorado Angel Investors in Fort Collins. We often make phone calls to those groups to help get our companies on the radar in other angel communities. We are starting to form relationships with groups like First Funder and local foundations that will provide companies with non-dilutive grants that don’t require selling equity.

Metrics

We try to tally up all the investments that are done in our companies. This is extremely hard to do. Last year our companies raised around $15 Million. We don’t have a fund so RVC doesn’t directly do any of that investment. Entrepreneurs love to remind me of that. Our metrics are important to show investors that RVC knows how to pick great companies that get investment. This metric also helps put Colorado on the map. Angel deals are often so quiet that you’d never know they were happening. We try to pull out the bull horn so everyone knows great things are happening with entrepreneurship in Colorado.

—–

 

Frequently asked questions about RVC Fees

(more extensive FAQ)

Do I have to pay to apply to pitch? No

Do I apply through the “Coaching Cloud” which has a fee? No. “RVC Pitch Your Business” is our group in the Business Catapult. There is no fee. You can also apply through GUST.

Do I have to take the Pitch Academy to apply to pitch? No, but I have to admit it helps us to see that you are ready to pitch if you pitch in the class. If you take the class, then get accepted, you don’t have to pay for the class again. We do suggest you come back and pitch in class again (for free) to get more feedback.

How much is the Pitch Academy Class? $149 for non-members, $125 for basic members, free for keystone members.

Do I have to pay for Pitch Academy AND the ticket to the pitch event? No. When you pitch at a conference, you pay for the ticket and get coached through a volunteer pitch coach for free. When you pitch in a monthly pitch meeting, you pay for the class with Peter and Nicole and then get into the pitch meeting for free.

Do I have to take Pitch Academy to Pitch? Yes. This is non-negotiable. How you pay for it is negotiable.

Do you forsee making the Pitch Academy or the pitch process free for entrepreneurs in the future? No. We think it’s fair for founders to contribute with either their time or money. This is a community-based non-profit. We think everyone should give a little to keep RVC going for another 27 years.

RVC staff members are all angels and don’t need to take home a salary, right? Ha ha ha ha ha! Whew, that’s a good one.

Do you take a cut of the deal when investment happens? No. We can’t. It’s not legal to do that unless you are a broker-dealer. We think it’s more important to be a trusted intermediary than to become a broker-dealer or even to work with one.

Do you take a finder’s fee? Again, not legal. See above.