Four Tips to Know if You Have Practiced Your Pitch Enough

Practicing your pitch is one of the most important parts of presenting to a group of investors.  While some people can do a pitch with relatively little practice, no one can just wing it.  So how do you know when you’re ready to pitch and you’ve practiced enough?   Here are a few quick tips:

1)       Practice at least ten times before you pitch in front of someone else.  You should get to the point where you’re not having to think about what you’re saying – you have key phrases that you use every time.

2)      Time your pitches.  If you have more than ten seconds of variation between the pitches,  that means you’re making up new stuff each time.  Practice enough times that you can hit the same amount of time within ten seconds each time you present.

3)      Memorize your slide order.  If you have fifteen slides, you should be able to recite the titles of each of the slides in order.  This way when you’re on your “problem” slide, you’ll know that the next slide is your “solution” slide and you can transition smoothly and powerfully from one thought to the next.  Have someone quiz you for the complete order and starting at random slides so that you always know what is coming next.

4)      Be smooth even if you have distractions.  Use the TechStars method and have people throw wadded up balls of paper at you while you’re pitching.  Have someone unplug the projector and then practice dealing with that smoothly and without dropping a beat in your presentation.  Things often go wrong in a pitch, so be ready to roll with the punches.

If you do these things, your pitches will be more professional and confident and you will be better prepared to communicate your ideas most effectively to investors.

Colorado Needs More Exits

At the Esprit Entrepreneur Conference in Boulder this week a question was asked about how we can make Colorado more than a flyover state and attract more out of state investment.

Given that Boulder and Denver are in the top three cities for startups on a per-capital basis, it’s clear that we don’t have a problem with developing an entrepreneurial community  and the great high quality deal flow that comes from that.  I’m continually impressed with the ability of the Front Range ecosystem to turn out high quality companies.

But, if we want to attract more out of state investors, we need to have more Colorado exits that we can celebrate and make public.  This year has been a great year for Colorado exits with the IPOs from Noodles & Company and Rally Software.  Both companies have more than doubled since their IPOs and are doing great.  We’ve also had a number of great $100 million plus acquisitions including LineRate and NexGen Storage.

Colorado needs to get the word out more about these great exits.  We’re well known for startups, but investors know that without exits, there is no way to get their money back.  In short, exits are what investors care about.  When investors see that our community is sophisticated and is thinking about how to best position ourselves for exit, even if it is an acquisition by an out-of-state firm,  that there is a greater chance of attracting those coastal dollars to Colorado.

Rockies Venture Club is celebrating Colorado Exits with its 25th Colorado Capital Conference November 6th and 7th, 2013.  www.coloradocapitalconference.org  We will be hosting twelve great startups whose pitches will ALL include a description of their exit strategy so that investors know how they will get their investment back.  The theme of the conference is Steven Covey’s Second Habit of Highly Successful People – “Begin with the End in Mind.”

We will also have speakers from the top companies who have had exits this year who will tell us how they positioned themselves, how they decided on IPO vs. acquisition, and when they actively started the exit process.  The fact that the founders are still with the companies shows that an “exit” is really a liquidity event where money is returned to investors, not an actual exit where the founders leave a company.  This year’s CCC is a must-attend event for investors and entrepreneurs alike.

Biz Girls 2013 Recap

 

BizGirls CampEvery year Biz Girls gets better and better.  We’ve evolved from the first year’s amazement that the girls could actually complete the program and get their companies live within the tight time limits of the program to this year’s re-branding of the program from “Biz Girls Camp” to “Biz Girls CEO Development Program.”

While the Biz Girls CEO Development Program works on the same values and principles as the “camp”, we’ve raised the bar on what is expected of the girls – and interestingly – they have raised the bar on what is expected of us.  In response to this, we implemented three new parts of the program this year.  We couldn’t have done this without the volunteer effort of Louise Campbell-Blair, who joined us as Biz Girls’ CMO to get our marketing program in place, but who ended up doing much, much more.  The three new programs include a Mentorship program, advanced workshops and sponsorships to help with tuition, allowing us to achieve our diversity goals.

Mentorship Program:  Each girl is given the option to have a mentor who will work with them after the program has completed.  In the past we’ve had challenges with getting continuity and providing a way for the girls to continue their businesses on into the school year.  We’re hoping that by providing a mentor who can give advice, help set realistic goals and monitor progress, will improve the chances that these young companies will continue to grow and thrive well after the summer ends.

Advanced Sessions in Web Design, Pitch Development and SEO.  This year we brought in a number of experts who helped by offering afternoon programs on three of the program days with advanced sessions covering web design, pitch development and marketing the web sites.  The results were amazing.  The pitches this year were great and included full powerpoint presentations.  The web sites were much more sophisticated and filled out with graphics and logos, especially in Boulder where the girls decided in their strategic plan that developing logos was important to them.  And finally, the SEO worked better than anyone had expected with Rachel from casetaste.com getting her first order the day after the program ended!  Rachel ended up on a CBS TV program as a result of her success!

Finally, we added a program for donors to sponsor a Biz Girl.  This was a tremendous success as it allowed us to pursue our objectives for diversity and make sure that no girl was denied a spot in the program because of an inability to come up with the tuition.  Thanks so much to the generous individuals who supported these girls!

For those of you who haven’t been involved, here’s a summary of the companies that we formed this year:

Denver:

Casetaste.com
Denverdusting.com
Tealpoppies.com
Tenniscoachfinder.com
Upcyclethreads.com
Boulder:
Writerslam.com
Bocodesigns.com
hannimals.com
inspiralook.com
fandomcentral.com

RVC Academy: Due Diligence

RVC Academy – Due Diligence 

Register for Angel Capital Summit 2013

by Thought Leader: Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4

When: June 25, 5-7pm

Where: Shift Workspaces, 383 Corona Street, Denver

Investors,

  • Ask the right questions to uncover the risks that could jeopardize your investment.
  • Learn to devote a short 10-20 hours of due diligence and discover what you need to make a smart decision.

Entrepreneurs,

  • Empower your deal by gathering your due diligence materials before investors even ask for them.
  • Close your deal faster by supporting your lead investor.

Taught by Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4. CID4 is a not-for-profit organization committed to Economic Development Through Innovation Advancement in the life sciences industries, by providing investment capital and management assistance. Lauren also serves on a number of Advisory and Executive Boards for early stage companies.

 

 

Venture Capital Bloggers: Who's who in the top 5 states

From time to time a new ranking of the VC must-read blogs appears on the internet. During the research for this post I went through many of them, some based on the number of unique visits some others on the author´s quality scale or personal preferences. As it turns out, the first fifteen positions are always taken by the same guys.

In a world where internet has taken over and leadership claims to be global, it occurred to me to check the relationship between an active and prolific VC community (based on # of deals and $ invested) and the existence of VC thought leaders in that community.

California, Massachusetts, New York, Washington and Texas ranked in the top five positions in terms of venture capital invested based on the 2012 figures provided by the National Venture Capital Association (Colorado was 6th. Yay!). Let’s see who are the most relevant venture capital bloggers in these communities and what are they saying.

 

For the purposes of this post a state is considered a Community and blogger is a thought leader. In the VC world, bloggers aren’t just opinionated, they are professionals with years of experience.

1. California:

Eureka! We have found it, the world champion in Venture Capital based on number of deals and amount invested. Thus it doesn’t come as a surprise that it is also the winner for the number of relevant bloggers!

Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: August Capital

Blog: Venture Blog.

Area: Los Angeles

Firm: GRP Partners

Blog: Bothsidesofthetable

  • Paul Graham: Co-founder of the Y combinator and for many the “king” of bloggers. In his minimalist looking website you can find gripping essays (no blogposts) that won´t leave you indifferent, just check his last one on how to get startup ideas.
Area: Mountain View

Firm: Y Combinator

Blog: PaulGraham

  • Chris Dixon: Entrepreneur and investor with a moderate style. Dixon is considered a “greater explainer of trends” and so he does in hardware startups.
Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: Andreessen Horowitz.

Blog: CDixon

  • Ben Horowitz:  self declared a rap fanatic, Horowitz uses rap lyrics as prefaces of his blogs and doesn´t have a problem disclosing numbers and strategies. Check his last post on how to hire sales people.
Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: Andreessen Horowitz

Blog: ben´s blog

The list doesn´t finish here it goes on and on with other brilliant bloggers such as Bill Gurley or Dave Mcclure. So it seems the most VC active state has the most active and relevant bloggers.

 

2. Massachusetts:

Meanwhile on the opposite coast, Massachusetts emerges as the second VC power.

  • Rob Go, Lee Howe, David Beisel. These three VCs are the cofounders of Next View Ventures, but apart from sharing their company they also share a passion for blogging each one of them with a different style and point of view.
Area: Boston

Firm: Next View Ventures

Blog:  Rob Go, Lee Howe, David Beisel

Area: Boston

Firm: Volition Capital

Blog:  Thinking about Thinking.

 

3. New York:

With New York City as largest, richest and most influential regional economy in the United States, and Manhattan as the home to six major stock markets, venture capital is rapidly growing in this region.

  • Fred Wilson: The raising voice for the New York Tech Scene. Famous for his blog section MBA Mondays  with around 160 posts in MBA topics such as revenue models-gaming. His blog constitutes an enormous body of work and knowledge worth a deep dive in.
Area: New York

Firm: Union Square Ventures

Blog: AVC

Area: New York

Firm: Brooklyn Ventures

Blog: Thisisgoingtobebig.com

 

4. Washington State

Nobody stood up in the Seattle community until the 7th of October of last year, when the VC Greg Gottesman wrote his first blogpost.

  • Greg Gottesman:. The VC mixes personal opinions and experiences with business tips and life style advices in a looking promising blog.
Area: Seattle

Firm: Madrona

Blog: starkRavingVC.

 

5.Texas

“The exception that proves the rule?” With a GDP bigger than The Netherlands or South Korea Texas ranks the 15th economy in the world and the 5th state in VC investment… And there is nobody taking the lead out there in the bloggosphere… The more I think about the whys of this, the more my fingertips tingle for a new blogpost.

If you are reading this and you know of someone please let us know we will be happy to include a Texan blogger!

 

6. Colorado:

Yup! I know It´s out of the top 5 but…

  • Brad Feld: In a mix between personal and professional thoughts Brad Feld has gained the respect of the VC and entrepreneur community not only in Colorado but also worldwide. Prolific, eclectic and sometimes controversial FeldThoughts is full of articles worth your time. Check out his last post on Software patents.
Area: Boulder

Firm: Foundry Group

Blog: Feld Thoughts

 

In a nutshell, in California, Massachusetts, New York and Colorado  the equation seems to work and a high levels of investment are accompanied by well-know blog leaders spreading the word out. On the contrary, Texas and Washington don’t follow the pattern! Yes, on the internet area leadership is global, but to certain extent VC investments and communities are still local and so they are their know-how and customs. Texan and Washingtonian bloggers or bloggers-to-be raise your voice! We avid readers, entrepreneurs, innovators, angels and investors want to know and are waiting for you!

 

About the Author: Sara Rodriguez is the new Associate Director of the Rockies Venture Club. Please consider welcoming her and introducing yourself when you see her at RVC events. 

 

 

Student Entrepreneurs at ACS Semi-Finals

The Angel Capital Summit 2013 Semi-finals were closed to the public. Instead, we invited some energetic student entrepreneurs to view the pitches. We know it’s hard for students to break out of their rigid schedules and ivory towers so the few who actually showed up that day are total stars. Eric Nydegger from the School of Mines attended to our semi-finals with Dr. Joy Godesiabois who understands the importance of connecting industry and academia.

Impressed with some of the questions that Eric had for the pitching companies, I caught up with him between pitches and asked him a question of my own.

“Eric, will you write about your experience here today for our online readership?”

Below is his take on the busy day:

[pullquote align=”left|center|right” textalign=”left|center|right” width=”30%”] Investors will consider investing in a founder who is excited about the business[/pullquote]

As with any college experience it is necessary to get outside of the structured institution and peruse different venues for the application of education in the business environment. Recently the undergraduate and graduate students at the Colorado School of Mines in the economics and business department were provided this opportunity through an invitation to attend the Angel Capital Summit 2013 Semi-Finals to gain insight into the process of the entrepreneur pitch to angel investors.

By personally experiencing the Semi-Finals and watching the angel investor coaches and judges in action, I was able to see first-hand the mannerisms, presenting strategy, and the basics of the pitch required to gain the interest of investors effectively and succinctly.

After each pitch, judges inquired about details. From the business’ Twitter handle to the summary slide, I was quickly able to see what investors would be looking for within the first crucial seconds of the five-minute pitch and throughout the entire presentation. As efficient methods of communication of the business were addressed, the varying entrepreneurs and coaches were conducted through a quick presentation and then a Q&A session to address questions, but to also allow for the knowledgeable judges to provide guidance and recommendations for the entrepreneurs on their presentations.

Some of the presentation tips included using timeline slides when effective, addressing the exit strategy, clarifying the product and the industry in the first crucial moments of the presentation, addressing current partnerships and networks that are currently developed and advantageous to the business, and most importantly highlighting the competitive advantages.

Other guidelines for the presentation strategy included using pictures to keep interest without distracting, create “the hook” within the first 30 seconds, and present with power and enthusiasm for the business. Investors will consider investing in a founder who is excited about the business with a poor product before investing with an individual that has a great product but a poor, unenthusiastic attitude.

The atmosphere of the practice pitch session gave me an understanding of the pressure of the presentations and the composure required by the entrepreneurs in order to effectively communicate their business and product.  As a practice session and a final elimination session before presenting to the multitude of investors the following week, the setting brought on a challenge to the entrepreneurs presenting, recognizing the significance of the experience. By simply observing the professional poise of some and the shaking and bending of notecards by others, the preparation and the experience of the speakers quickly became apparent to all those observing.

Throughout the enlightening experience and in preparation for our own class presentations of our business plans it was most certainly an informative and educational experience to supplement the classroom experience. The familiarity to the situation will certainly prepare those that attended not only the pitch session but the conference as well with a new awareness and vision for the young entrepreneurs into the innovative business environment.

Part of the Rockies Venture Club mission is to help build the pipeline of great entrepreneurs in Colorado. We are excited to report that 6% of our Angel Capital Summit Attendees were students. The audience contained student representatives from the School of Mines, Regis, and CU Boulder.

 

RVC Academy: Seed Stage Education

Ed note: These classes have already occurred. Please contact nicole@rockiesventureclub.org to request a class to be run again.

RVC Academy – Seed Stage Investment Education

We have two high-quality classes on the calendar in the next two weeks as we prepare for the Angel Capital Summit.

 


Follow RVC Classes on Twitter #RVCacademy


Register for Angel Capital Summit 2013

Due Diligence (9 more seats have been added!)

by Thought Leader: Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4

When: Feb 25, 4-6pm

Where: Shift Workspaces, 383 Corona Street, Denver

Investors,

  • Ask the right questions to uncover the risks that could jeopardize your investment.
  • Learn to devote a short 10-20 hours of due diligence and discover what you need to make a smart decision.

Entrepreneurs,

  • Empower your deal by gathering your due diligence materials before investors even ask for them.
  • Close your deal faster by supporting your lead investor.

Taught by Lauren Costantini, Ph.D. from CID4. CID4 is a not-for-profit organization committed to Economic Development Through Innovation Advancement in the life sciences industries, by providing investment capital and management assistance. Lauren also serves on a number of Advisory and Executive Boards for early stage companies.

 


Vetting Exit StrategiesRegister for Angel Capital Summit 2013

by Thought Leader: Tom Caltrider, Managing Director, Corporate Development Capital, LLC

When: March 4, 9-11am

Where: Holland and Hart Office: 555 17th St #3200 Denver

Stephen Covey, in his very popular book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People gave as his second habit:

Begin with the End in Mind

Whether you are an angel investing in a new company or a founder who is pitching to angels, it is important to your personal net worth to figure out what the End or the Exit will be for this venture. Investors and Founders will enjoy an in depth discussion on exit strategies as they relate to companies that are seeking seed stage capital.

Successful angel deals result in a return on investment in 3-7 years. To get there, we need to begin with the end in mind.

This two hour Exit Planning session will discuss the following:

  • What is an exit?
  • What are your goals?
  • How to build an exit strategy?
  • Implementing the exit.

 

Pay to pitch?

[Clarification Note: See bottom of post for FAQ about which RVC services require a fee.]

Pitching companies contact me all confused about having to pay for Pitch Academy before they pitch to investors. Another thing I get a lot of guff for is the fact that we require pitching companies to pay for their conference tickets at the Angel Capital Summit. I was told that for a pitching company to pay for the conference is like the band having to pay to attend their own show.

We have a provision where we’ll waive your fees if you pay us back with your time. For ten hours of volunteer work, you can get through our system entirely cash free. This is a community organization, we have plenty of work for volunteers. One word of warning, if you want to volunteer, you have to actually try to be helpful. Playing with your phone for hours while I handle the deluge of event attendees at the door, like one CEO that will remain nameless, is not really helpful. Understandably, founders often find that they are busy with their company and would rather just pay for the class.

Why are we gouging entrepreneurs with these horrible fees for a simple 5 minutes of air time?

[pullquote align=”right” textalign=”right” width=”30%”]At RVC we spend two days talking with investors about each company after the pitch.[/pullquote]

Wow, that really does sound bad, doesn’t it? The pitch is only the tip of the iceberg. The pitch is the public part, and from the outside it looks like all we do is pitch companies every month and take their hard earned cash.

Actually, we do a quite a bit more than that.

 

 

 

Reviews

By the time a company pitches with RVC, we’ve already had reviewers vetting their company and determining if they are ready for investment. It would be a huge disservice for us to pitch companies randomly, or just have them get in line and pitch when they wanted to. Readiness is a big deal and if we pitch a company too early, investors get the message that it’s not a good company (right or wrong). Our reviewers are experienced volunteers, but it takes hours of administrative staff time to sort, manage, and account for all the applications that come in to make sure that everyone gets fairly reviewed.

Pitch Academy

I’m really proud of this class that Peter has put together. Pitch Academy is a 4 hour class that is a drink-from-the-firehose lecture that encompasses everything we’ve learned about angels, pitching to angels, and most importantly pitching to our angels. We know who is investing right now and we know the messages that they want to hear. After the lecture, companies pitch in class and get constructive comments.

This class is always full even when we run an extra class in the month. People take Pitch Academy before they even apply to pitch just so they know what they are getting themselves into with angel investing.

Attending Pitch Academy used to be optional. We quickly learned that it was very important. Audience members were having no trouble at all picking out the company who had not come to pitch academy and we determined that it was a disservice to pitch a company without giving them some extensive feedback first. Even good pitches seem bad when they haven’t been standardized with the current trends.

After taking the Pitch Academy class, every pitch your company does will be better, sharper, and more focused on the investment deal. We teach investor-speak.

Investor Forum

Founders may not realize that at RVC we spend two days talking with investors about each company after the pitch. Both Peter and I manage 6 hours of investor meetings each month acting as each pitching company’s agent. We go over the pitch deck, discuss the points that investors want to learn more about, and get to the nitty gritty about what they need to move forward with due diligence. It’s important that this is done without the founder present. That anonymity gives investors a chance to talk candidly and determine what it would take for them to get involved with the deal.

RVC Investor Forum exists because of thousands of hours of investor community building done by RVC staff. We spend a lot of time working with angels to teach the skills of investing so they are educated when they approach you for negotiation. An educated angel is much easier to work with when you are closing a round.

Some have argued that instead of the entrepreneur paying fees, the angels should pay for these services. They do! We divide the costs between the entrepreneur and the angels.

Entrepreneurs think that angels are the haves and the founders are the have nots. Therefore angels should foot the bill for everything in this process. It’s important to understand that although a founder might need an angel to grow his business, an angel never needs a founder. Angels don’t have a mandate to invest like VCs do. Angel investing is a hobby, not a job, or a requirement. If we add all the fees to the angel side of the seasaw, they’ll just take their ball and go home. Nobody wants that.

Referrals

If your company needs a lot of money, it makes sense for you to share your deal with High Altitude Investors in Colorado Springs or Colorado Angel Investors in Fort Collins. We often make phone calls to those groups to help get our companies on the radar in other angel communities. We are starting to form relationships with groups like First Funder and local foundations that will provide companies with non-dilutive grants that don’t require selling equity.

Metrics

We try to tally up all the investments that are done in our companies. This is extremely hard to do. Last year our companies raised around $15 Million. We don’t have a fund so RVC doesn’t directly do any of that investment. Entrepreneurs love to remind me of that. Our metrics are important to show investors that RVC knows how to pick great companies that get investment. This metric also helps put Colorado on the map. Angel deals are often so quiet that you’d never know they were happening. We try to pull out the bull horn so everyone knows great things are happening with entrepreneurship in Colorado.

—–

 

Frequently asked questions about RVC Fees

(more extensive FAQ)

Do I have to pay to apply to pitch? No

Do I apply through the “Coaching Cloud” which has a fee? No. “RVC Pitch Your Business” is our group in the Business Catapult. There is no fee. You can also apply through GUST.

Do I have to take the Pitch Academy to apply to pitch? No, but I have to admit it helps us to see that you are ready to pitch if you pitch in the class. If you take the class, then get accepted, you don’t have to pay for the class again. We do suggest you come back and pitch in class again (for free) to get more feedback.

How much is the Pitch Academy Class? $149 for non-members, $125 for basic members, free for keystone members.

Do I have to pay for Pitch Academy AND the ticket to the pitch event? No. When you pitch at a conference, you pay for the ticket and get coached through a volunteer pitch coach for free. When you pitch in a monthly pitch meeting, you pay for the class with Peter and Nicole and then get into the pitch meeting for free.

Do I have to take Pitch Academy to Pitch? Yes. This is non-negotiable. How you pay for it is negotiable.

Do you forsee making the Pitch Academy or the pitch process free for entrepreneurs in the future? No. We think it’s fair for founders to contribute with either their time or money. This is a community-based non-profit. We think everyone should give a little to keep RVC going for another 27 years.

RVC staff members are all angels and don’t need to take home a salary, right? Ha ha ha ha ha! Whew, that’s a good one.

Do you take a cut of the deal when investment happens? No. We can’t. It’s not legal to do that unless you are a broker-dealer. We think it’s more important to be a trusted intermediary than to become a broker-dealer or even to work with one.

Do you take a finder’s fee? Again, not legal. See above.

 

 

 

RVC Academy kickoff a huge success

I’ll admit to having spent an inordinate number of adult years in academia and I hold two advanced degrees to show for it. I’m no stranger to the teaching part of higher education either; I’ve been in front of many hopeful faces looking for knowledge. But there is something very inaccessible about traditional higher education that I just don’t like.

I took a single graduate class a couple of years ago in a well-known university. The school made me register as a special, non-degree seeking student. The Dean of Students had to OK my registration and it took over a month to actually get the signature. Then I had to take time off work for 15 straight weeks to attend the class. Let’s just say the whole process was a pain in the neck and I don’t wish that hassle on anyone.

Last year I heard comments from conference goers at both the ACS2012 and the CCC2012. People said that they always love the seminar parts of the conferences. The most common complaint was that the seminars were too short and we were only scratching the surface of the topic. This got me thinking.

What if Rockies Venture Club were able to provide continuing education classes taught by industry experts just like the Universities do? Although we thought we might have a couple of modifications to the traditional course plan. RVC Academy classes would be stand-alone, two-hour events so you don’t have to worry about scheduling months in advance. The classes would be focused on issues surrounding private equity since that’s what we do best. Since these issues are important to both entrepreneurs and investors we’d make sure that all classes were open to both types of folks to learn side by side.

Our classes are open to the public. You don’t need to be accepted to the program like TechStars or the Founder institute, just register quickly online and attend. Although we do have to charge tuition for the classes, we are planning to schedule once a month classes that are free to all RVC members. Also, all classes are free to Keystone Members so we do feel good about providing the community with affordable options.

We just started the regular series of classes this month and frankly, we didn’t know how amazing these classes were going to be. Not to toot our own horns but, holy shmoly these classes were a good idea! It turns out that our community is just crawling with expertise.

  • Mid January, Brian Tsuchiya gave an overview of the little known ways to register your investor deal with the state of Colorado. Colorado has form RL and SCOR which allow you some freedom in advertising your deal publicly and legally.
  • January 28th we had Lauren Ivison from Clear Creek Partners and Kelly Matthews from RWO teach a room of investors and entrepreneurs about structuring their investment deal. Lauren occasionally has to turn away folks seeking A Round investment because they’ve so badly botched previous term sheets. Her class will certainly help folks prevent this kind of avoidable flub.

We saw great attendance at both of these classes and people’s wheels were really turning as they scribbled notes furiously. The format is such that we have lots of time for discussion and interaction. Also, we want students to go home with new knowledge, but not so much new information that they can’t process it.

We’re super excited about the pipeline of great classes in the next few months.

In the beginning of February we’ll learn about Market Strategy and Branding from Access Marketing Company.  At the end of the month, we’ll get an in depth view of Due Diligence from Lauren Costantini (CID4). She’ll school us on how much due diligence angels should reasonably be doing, how they should  go about it, and how can entrepreneurs can make the process easier to accomplish.

Even the Angel Capital Summit in March will be affected by our new view on continuing education. The workshops will be longer and get deeper into the nitty gritty of the topics presented.

I’m particularly excited about this spring’s educational lineup. Michael Armstrong from Front Range CFO will hold two classes on accounting. The first will be a basic course to get all of us non-accountants up to speed on accounting basics like quickbooks, debits/credits, balance statements, and statements of cashflow. The second class will be focused on challenging and defending pro formas. Having never taken an accounting class in my whole life, I’m pretty excited to see what Michael can teach me.

RVC Academy is in pilot stage. We are completely open to suggestions for future classes! In the comments, let us know what topics you’d like to see or teach this year.

Nicole Gravagna, MS, PhD, is the Director of Operations for the Rockies Venture Club. After having spent way too many years involved in formal educational programs, she is happy to be guiding the RVC Academy, which can best be described as an “informal educational program”.