Rockies Venture Club

Rockies Venture Club Post-Funding Strategies

After the first angel or VC funding round closes and the checks are cashed, most startups go through a transformation, like from a caterpillar to a butterfly, that makes them fundamentally different than a pre-funding company.  CEOs who fail to realize the changes that need to happen will end up facing challenges they did not expect.

Here are a few changes that need to take place after funding:

  1. Create a budget.

    No – not your proforma with all the optimistic sales projections – this should be a budget with numbers you can commit to.  Many companies feel like having a million dollars in the bank is an unlimited blank check to buy fancy new furniture or hire a dozen new employees. But all those things drain cash faster than you think and having a written plan for minimizing your burn rate and maximizing the runway to your next raise (or hitting break-even) is going to be an important part of your success.  Running out of cash before you hit the milestones needed for the next raise is a death sentence for your startup.

  2. Update the Professionals that Serve Your Business.

    If you’ve had your Aunt Bertha doing your books, it’s probably time to upgrade to a CPA who can provide you with the advice you need to keep from making mistakes.  A CPA is going to be important once you need audits as well.  Your legal team should now include several different legal specialties including securities, Patent and IP, and general business and contracts.  You probably got your legal house cleaned up in order to get funding and now is the time to get the right people on board to keep it that way.  Bankers, insurance, and other advisors are all going to be able to scale with you as you grow.

  3. Communicate with Investors.  

    Investors notice when you stop calling them after the check has cleared.  This is a bad thing for founders – especially those who are going to need to raise another round.  Future investors will contact first round investors during diligence and a good relationship is important – even more so if you hope to have follow-on rounds from your first funders.  Monthly reports including good and bad news, financials and metrics updates are a minimum.  It’s better to stay on top of the investor relationship and by communicating frequently, investors are more on-board with what’s happening.  Use a platform like Reportedly.co that allows you to see who has opened your messages and also allows investors to comment and offer help when needed.

  4. Balance Growth and Resources.

    You’ve been pitching your $100 million top line you expect in five years, but now it’s time to match your resources to your growth targets.  Grow too slowly and you’ll never raise another round (so you’d better hit break-even) and grow too fast and you’ll run out of cash before you hit the benchmarks for Series A and then game-over.  Perfect balance is what you need for venture success.

  5. Update your Exit Strategy (Goals and Contacts)  

    During your pitch everyone wanted to acquire you, but now it’s time to start executing on your Exit Strategy.  You should include the update in every board meeting and monthly update.  Start making contacts with those companies for whom you create value early on.  If they don’t know who you are, you’re not going to get the multiple offers you need for that 5X multiple you were lusting after.

  6. Metrics.

     Ok, you think you’re growing too fast to waste time on shit like metrics.  Fine – go ahead and be mediocre.  The best companies are crystal clear on what success looks like, how to measure it and what their goals are.  Without metrics, your team is mis-aligned, your investors are in the dark, and really – you haven’t got a clue about where you’re going.  You don’t have time not to do this.

  7. Strategic Plan

    It’s not set in stone, but without a roadmap you’re bound to get nowhere fast.  Companies without at least a lightweight two pager plan find themselves going through expensive pivots left and right to try to figure out what they could have done in the first place with a good planning process.  BTW, statistics say that after three pivots you’re out.

  8. Change from Tech Culture to Sales Culture.  

    So far, success has looked like getting your MVP launched.  You are three founders and a dog coding away in a basement somewhere, but now you need to change gears and become a sales and marketing company with a tech foundation.  Too many companies can’t get out of their tech roots and they keep on coding, but never figure out how to sell.  Break out of your comfort zone and start selling.

  9. Speed up.

     You’re on the clock now and capital is the most powerful accelerator out there.  You’ve got to code fast, sell fast, grow fast.  Companies that think they can continue on their old pace don’t get venture capital.  It’s a race against the clock with ROI multiples of 10X in five years, 25X in seven, there’s no time to waste and the slow starters won’t ever get to Series A.

  10. Investors are your partners.

     Now that the deal has closed, and all the negotiations are done, it’s time to tap into your investor base for help, connections and advice.  Keep them in the loop and engage them – they’re worth a lot more than just capital.

 

Good Luck

Post funding transformation is hard and unnatural for most founders.  Pay attention to your successful peers and remember that getting rounds of funding are not what this is all about – work towards creating a great, meaningful company with huge value for your exit partners!

 

 


Peter Adams is the Managing Director of the Rockies Venture Fund, Executive Director of Rockies Venture Club and Co-Author of Venture Capital for Dummies, John Wiley & Sons, August 2013.  Available at Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble and your local bookstore.

Women make up the fastest growing community of angel investors and it’s changing the face of Angel Capital for the better.

Angel groups like Rockies Venture Club have been beating national averages for investing in women and minority led companies with 54% of our portfolio consisting of women and minority led companies vs a national average of just 14%.  But in order to balance the ecosystem it’s important not just to invest in women led companies, but to engage women angels who can help mentor startups and who can gain experience serving on the board of directors of some of the startups they invest in, thus paving the way for increasing the number of women on corporate boards at all levels.

Research shows that companies with women on boards out perform those with no or few women.  Companies wit

RVC Women Investor Network

h the highest percentages of women on their boards outperform their less diverse peers by 66%.  We have certainly seen these trends in our portfolio companies and are committed to developing further diversity in our community.

We have launched the RVC Women’s Investors Network  (WIN), led by Barbara Bauer.  The network has had several well-attended events that focus on angel education and making connections.  The group is based on four principles that play on women’s strengths:

Engagement: Programs that allow people to work together and share wisdom of crowds to make good decisions and great investments.

Give Back: WIN members have years of business experience and they want to be more than just a check – they like to mentor and coach up and coming companies.

Act From Knowledge: Women like to understand the landscape before they jump in and invest.  No more “fake it until you make it” – that can cost thousands for new angel investors!

Education: Classes, workshops and “get to know an angel” events provide deep venture capital knowledge to get WIN members up and going quickly and confidently.

If you’re interested in engaging with the group, volunteering, or just learning more, consider attending the WIN Luncheon at the Angel Capital Summit, Tuesday March 21 on the DU Campus.

Click HERE to register

If you’re interested in learning more about Angel Investing and Venture Capital, you should definitely attend the full Angel Capital Summit.  Tuesday-Wednesday March 21-22 in Denver.

Click HERE for more information and to sign up.

Want to learn more about Rockies Venture Club?  Check us out at www.rockiesventureclub.org

Rockies Venture Club has funded 14 deals in the past year, bringing its portfolio mix to include 55% companies which are female and minority led vs. the national average of just 14.4%. Read more

Rockies Venture Club (RVC) is excited to announce an entrepreneur and investor education program partnership with one of Japan’s most prestigious early stage venture capital firm, Future Venture Capital (FVC). Read more

There’s a lot to know about angel investing, but the one thing most people miss is how to syndicate a deal.  Almost every angel investment deal in an entrepreneur’s company is a syndication and there’s a lot more to it than just getting a bunch of investors together.   Read more

For 30+ years Rockies Venture Club has brought together aspiring entrepreneurs and investors of all types and has emerged as the leading angel investing organization in Colorado. Read more

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Better … Faster … Deal-Making
A Track Record of Success

Pursue your own successful investment strategy. Engage with thought leaders and experienced Angel investors. Don’t just take our word for it.  Explore these recent success stories made possible by the Angel Capital Summit (ACS) hosted by Rockies Venture Club (RVC). Read more

Rockies Venture Club is pleased to share the news that more than three years after passing the JOBS act, the SEC has adopted new rules to permit crowdfunding.  This means that those who could not previously qualify as an “accredited investor” with $1 million or more in assets or $200K in annual earnings or more, can now participate in early stage investing.

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