Jon Weston is convinced that his company’s product can help take away pain, help the body heal twice as fast in some cases, and even save lives. It is particularly interesting to see a former pharmaceutical executive get so excited about a non-drug, non-invasive therapy that helps people use less medication. After I saw him pitch, I had to find out more.

I was first introduced to BioCare’s product when Jon presented at the Angel Capital Summit in Denver earlier this year. He showed the LumiWave, a powerful and safe near-infrared light therapy used to relieve pain and promote healing in many tissues in our bodies. The device uses rectangular pods of LEDs a couple of inches wide to emit a frequency of light, which provides pain relief, increased blood flow, and even the growth of new blood vessels when applied to an injured area. This means that in addition to relieving chronic pain like arthritis, it can cut healing time by more than 50% in some injuries – and in other cases can re-start healing where the body has been stagnant in an injured state for years. The science is fascinating, but too involved to go into on this site – check out my explanation here. (coming soon)

I had heard of (and played with) infrared light therapy before, since my father, a MD in Michigan, had been using another device in his practice for the better part of the last year. He’s been finding profound and sometimes unexpected success, especially in curbing or curing a variety of chronic ailments for patients who weren’t responding effectively to traditional medicine. My mom tried it on her arthritic hands, and the pain all but disappeared after a few weeks of sessions. My dad calls pretty frequently to talk about the latest treatment or a cool new medical device, but it meant more to hear my mom talk about how a light therapy took away pain that has invaded her life for years.

While that device certainly helped people heal well, they have some limitations. They’re not as easy to use, and not cheap, either – the units he’s purchased have cost over $2,000 per light. BioCare’s product was entirely different from the other infrared treatment devices I’ve seen (and dramatically less expensive) so I had to take a closer look.

I gave Jon a call to hear about it in more detail, and we were able to grab coffee by DU, where he got his MBA, and I got my bachelor’s degree. He is a molecular biologist by training; a former pharmaceutical executive who spent years bringing products from R&D to market for companies like Searle (now Pfizer) and Gambro. While some of these medications went on to do very well, he’s convinced that infrared can be safer and more effective than traditional drugs for some problems. A number of years ago he met BioCare co-founder and Chairman Sherry Fox, who worked with her late husband (a biomedical engineer with 15 patents) to develop the initial technology for the LumiWave. Jon came on board as COO in 2005, and stepped into the CEO role in 2009.

It’s no secret that medical device companies need a longer runway than other startups due to the intensive R&D process. Techstars CEO David Cohen joked at a Silicon Flatirons event this week about a “17 year accelerator” if they were to have one in the biotech industry. Many investors aren’t comfortable with or don’t understand the R&D process, so thankfully BioCare has been able to bootstrap the company so far. Before opening it up to investors, they wanted to make sure the biggest risks were taken care of – the technology was sound, real units were selling and being used extensively, and strategic partnerships were in place. They’ve also had the chance to acquire patents, an over-the-counter FDA clearance, and they’re sailing toward the next approval level. Their patents and years of progress in these areas provide particularly high barriers to entry for even large medical device companies.

While IP is great, it doesn’t make money… well, until it actually makes money. That’s why it’s so valuable to have product sales and revenue while rounding out the R&D process. Aligning with lean startup practices, they signed high value, paying customers (who generated real market feedback) as early as they could. They’ve made some pivots, and their open-mindedness has allowed them to find some of the fastest growing sectors of their potential market.

It can be both a blessing and a curse to have a product that can be used so widely. Pinpointing not just the largest markets, but the ones most motivated to act on their literal pain points was of key importance. Perhaps the most common use of infrared light therapy is for the treatment of osteoarthritis or other types of chronic pain, like my mom had, so that was BioCare’s first major application. While the chronic pain segment may have the largest number of people and dollars in it, Jon saw early on that the only way to really make a difference there is with widespread adoption by the health insurance companies, not known for moving quickly and fairly preoccupied with legislative items at the moment.

While the insurance companies are still moving toward adopting infrared, he wasn’t going to wait for permission. The sports medicine and physical therapy industry was another reasonable market choice, and once they tried, he saw considerable traction here. This segment is especially motivated to pay for faster healing times, especially at the highest levels of competition, where there is also often significant pain with injuries. Thankfully for BioCare, the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs was only a short drive from Denver, and the Olympians took to it very quickly. The effects were so dramatic and positive that the Manager of Sports Medicine and Training for the US Olympic Centers offered to be on BioCare’s advisory board. She’s joined on the board with others who have volunteered after seeing the device in action – a few top orthopedic surgeons, three professors of medicine, and a trainer for the US Naval Academy, among others.

While sports medicine seems to have done very well for BioCare, they’ve kept an eye out for other substantial markets on the horizon. The most exciting and revolutionary development recently is the treatment of injuries that are less obvious and often more damaging – traumatic brain injury. As a neuroscience nerd, this was particularly riveting for me. More of the science here (coming soon)

For the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) BioCare is partnering with Cerescan, an industry leading, Denver-based brain imaging company. I was able to tour Cerescan with CEO John Kelley, who told me they have tested literally a team’s worth of NFL players for the diagnosis of TBI, some after suicide attempts. There is another group terribly affected by TBI – our nation’s military. BioCare and Cerescan joined with the Tug McGraw Foundation for the Invisible Brain Injury Project to study just that. This project will continue remarkable pilot testing they’ve done with veterans so far.

The military experience often adds a dangerous element to a volatile situation in the brain – the high prevalence of PTSD upon returning from service. The number of deaths from combat is horrifying and significant – and the increasing number of veterans who take their own life is a sad, and unfortunately frequent tragedy. It is made worse by being poorly understood, with few effective treatments and no real cures available – so far. In the initial round of testing, they’ve seen remarkable success with every patient they’ve tried it on. One particularly moving story involved a vet with TBI, PTSD, and a few recent suicide attempts. After a brain scan confirmed his neurological issues, and then a number of weeks in treatment, he was off all of his psychiatric medications. He had a follow-up scan, and then went back to work for the first time in a year and a half. Other participants have had similar stories, and while this treatment still needs to be validated in a study with a larger sample size, all signs are pointing in the right direction.

If these treatments continue to work so effectively, how much value will someone place on getting their life back? What will the family think as they watch a loved one go from nearly dead to “feeling like their old self again”?

I see a fair number of startup pitches. Most have at least pretty good ideas, and nearly every entrepreneur projects a hockey stick-shaped growth. A few have the chance for real traction, and it’s rare to find a company that claims such a big impact on the real quality of life for its customers. Biotech is hard to launch, but when it works, it can return big. It will certainly be interesting to follow BioCare as they attempt to change the world by healing the people in it.

 

 

Colorado has a lot to offer cleantech entrepreneurs, from targeted grants, to easy access to NREL’s technology commercialization resources, to cleantech focused entrepreneurial programs at top research universities, to name just a few. There is no more supportive place in the country to launch a cleantech company, which gives local angels a distinct advantage when investing in this growing, and complex, industry. Colorado knows about investing in cleantech.

The only way the community could do more to support cleantech would be to scour the country for experienced, successful entrepreneurs, bring them to Colorado and immerse them in the local cleantech ecosystem, then provide guidance from industry experts as they develop business ideas around one of the numerous innovations emerging from local government labs and universities. Enter the Cleantech Fellows Institute, a Colorado Cleantech Industry Association (CCIA) program established to do exactly that.

The Institute kicked off in 2012, with a class of 5 Fellows who had considerable entrepreneurial experience outside the cleantech industry. The Fellows knew how to start a business, but they didn’t know cleantech, so they spent 175 curriculum hours listening to 160 speakers, and took almost 30 cleantech related tours, to come up to speed. Each Fellow undertook a capstone project centered on a new cleantech business idea, and in the Institute’s inaugural year this exercise led to the creation of two seed-stage companies and one non-profit.

Under the direction of Executive Director Steve Berens, the Institute is now accepting applications for its second class of Fellows. This year the program is undergoing some changes based on lessons learned from the first class, including an expanded international component. The program will include a week during which delegates from around the world descend on Colorado to participate in the Institute’s activities and make connections between the cleantech communities in Colorado and their home countries.

Clearly, Colorado is putting a lot of effort into stacking the odds in favor of the Fellows and the cleantech companies they hope will emerge from the Institute. The VC community has taken notice, as evidenced by the 19 venture capital partners the program has brought on board to date. However, there is room for additional engagement from Colorado based angels, who have an advantage in their ability to participate throughout the process since the Institute is based in their own backyard. Interested angels can send an email to mailto:info@cleantechfellows.comto learn more and sign up for regular email updates.

Even with all of the support Fellows will receive through the Institute, cleantech remains one of the most challenging industries in which to start a new venture. The Cleantech Fellows Institute provides access to critical knowledge and a great support network, which will reduce risks in my opinion but it certainly doesn’t come close to eliminating them. The real determinant of the program’s ability to spawn successful cleantech startups is underway right now: the Fellows application process. The quality of the Fellows accepted into the program will have the greatest influence on how successful it is, and the ability of local angels to get to know the Fellows over the course of the program is an opportunity that should not be missed.

Jay Holman is Principal of Venture to Market LLC, a Boulder based consultancy providing go to market services for new ventures in the cleantech industry.

 

 


Fundraising for start-ups is a popular topic these days. There is a lot of glory in receiving big money from investors. After all, there must be promise in your company if Angels or VCs are willing to invest.

Have you ever tried to reach the pot of gold at the end of a rainbow? Literally. Like, have you ever seen a rainbow and tried to walk or drive to the end of it? It’s impossible. The end of the rainbow is elusive. And its location fluctuates and often disappears altogether. This is a fantastic metaphor for fundraising.

An entrepreneur is sometimes more likely to  grow a company by financing it themselves and working hard to build their business from the ground up. What’s more, the bootstrapping entrepreneur will gain better control over the future decisions–something that may disappear with big investors on board.

Sure, some start-ups do gain a bit of notoriety when they become venture-backed, but at what price? If someone is going to give you loads of money, they don’t do so without expecting a lot in return. Fundraising is “really like celebrating someone going into debt. Even equity investors expect a payback.” Does a business founder really want to owe everything to backers?  If you have a strong notion of how you want to build your company, it can pay to make your way independently.

So what exactly does bootstrapping a business involve? Bootstrapping in business means building a start-up by using internal cash flow (as opposed to money from family, friends, or investors) and little to no external help.  This method of growth is undeniably slower than big investments up front, but the time and effort can pay off. As “angel investor and wine entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk has said, ‘My dad taught me that when you borrow money it’s the worst day of your life.’” The bootstrapper can obtain financial independence and pursue the mission of her start-up unabated if she is willing to go the distance. Nobody will be knocking on her door looking for a return on investment except herself.

What are some ways bootstrappers can keep the company afloat in this entrepreneurial journey? After all, it’s not easy by any means, and there will be perils around many a corner. Startups can grow by reinvesting profits in their own growth if bootstrapping costs are low and return on investment is high. The entrepreneur can also continue working otherwise to fund the new venture. Or the business model might require customer financing – asking for payment up front before the service or product is delivered. And of course, there are an unlimited amount of other creative solutions for bootstrapping, ones to be determined most useful on a per-company basis.

What are some examples of successful bootstrapping? You might see somebody with experience in start-ups creating a new business. Nick Denton is a good example –after leaving his first company, First Tuesday, this guy worked out of an inexpensive storefront to build Gawker, a company now valued at $150 million.  On the other end, you have Sophia Amoruso who worked inconsequential odd jobs until she earned profitability and $30 million in annual sales with her clothing start-up, Nasty Gal. She bootstrapped her way to success in five years of sales on Ebay.

All of this bootstrapping talk isn’t meant so much as a deterrent to fundraising as it is used to suggest an alternative method for more securely and independently building your business instead. Nobody can deny the allure of that pot of gold at the end of the entrepreneurial rainbow. I mean, who would say she doesn’t want her idea or product to hit it big in all senses of that phrase? It’s just that very few ventures will actually end that way so easily and without consequence. If you want control, financially and structurally, of your company, it just might be better to spend the time buying a pot, finding gold bit by bit to fill it, and then painting the rainbow yourself.

 

Stacy Gregg is an educator, runner, reader, and mom to two energetic pre-schoolers. She joined the Rockies Venture Club at the end of 2012 to support the communications side of the organization.

From time to time a new ranking of the VC must-read blogs appears on the internet. During the research for this post I went through many of them, some based on the number of unique visits some others on the author´s quality scale or personal preferences. As it turns out, the first fifteen positions are always taken by the same guys.

In a world where internet has taken over and leadership claims to be global, it occurred to me to check the relationship between an active and prolific VC community (based on # of deals and $ invested) and the existence of VC thought leaders in that community.

California, Massachusetts, New York, Washington and Texas ranked in the top five positions in terms of venture capital invested based on the 2012 figures provided by the National Venture Capital Association (Colorado was 6th. Yay!). Let’s see who are the most relevant venture capital bloggers in these communities and what are they saying.

 

For the purposes of this post a state is considered a Community and blogger is a thought leader. In the VC world, bloggers aren’t just opinionated, they are professionals with years of experience.

1. California:

Eureka! We have found it, the world champion in Venture Capital based on number of deals and amount invested. Thus it doesn’t come as a surprise that it is also the winner for the number of relevant bloggers!

Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: August Capital

Blog: Venture Blog.

Area: Los Angeles

Firm: GRP Partners

Blog: Bothsidesofthetable

  • Paul Graham: Co-founder of the Y combinator and for many the “king” of bloggers. In his minimalist looking website you can find gripping essays (no blogposts) that won´t leave you indifferent, just check his last one on how to get startup ideas.
Area: Mountain View

Firm: Y Combinator

Blog: PaulGraham

  • Chris Dixon: Entrepreneur and investor with a moderate style. Dixon is considered a “greater explainer of trends” and so he does in hardware startups.
Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: Andreessen Horowitz.

Blog: CDixon

  • Ben Horowitz:  self declared a rap fanatic, Horowitz uses rap lyrics as prefaces of his blogs and doesn´t have a problem disclosing numbers and strategies. Check his last post on how to hire sales people.
Area: Menlo Park / Silicon Valley

Firm: Andreessen Horowitz

Blog: ben´s blog

The list doesn´t finish here it goes on and on with other brilliant bloggers such as Bill Gurley or Dave Mcclure. So it seems the most VC active state has the most active and relevant bloggers.

 

2. Massachusetts:

Meanwhile on the opposite coast, Massachusetts emerges as the second VC power.

  • Rob Go, Lee Howe, David Beisel. These three VCs are the cofounders of Next View Ventures, but apart from sharing their company they also share a passion for blogging each one of them with a different style and point of view.
Area: Boston

Firm: Next View Ventures

Blog:  Rob Go, Lee Howe, David Beisel

Area: Boston

Firm: Volition Capital

Blog:  Thinking about Thinking.

 

3. New York:

With New York City as largest, richest and most influential regional economy in the United States, and Manhattan as the home to six major stock markets, venture capital is rapidly growing in this region.

  • Fred Wilson: The raising voice for the New York Tech Scene. Famous for his blog section MBA Mondays  with around 160 posts in MBA topics such as revenue models-gaming. His blog constitutes an enormous body of work and knowledge worth a deep dive in.
Area: New York

Firm: Union Square Ventures

Blog: AVC

Area: New York

Firm: Brooklyn Ventures

Blog: Thisisgoingtobebig.com

 

4. Washington State

Nobody stood up in the Seattle community until the 7th of October of last year, when the VC Greg Gottesman wrote his first blogpost.

  • Greg Gottesman:. The VC mixes personal opinions and experiences with business tips and life style advices in a looking promising blog.
Area: Seattle

Firm: Madrona

Blog: starkRavingVC.

 

5.Texas

“The exception that proves the rule?” With a GDP bigger than The Netherlands or South Korea Texas ranks the 15th economy in the world and the 5th state in VC investment… And there is nobody taking the lead out there in the bloggosphere… The more I think about the whys of this, the more my fingertips tingle for a new blogpost.

If you are reading this and you know of someone please let us know we will be happy to include a Texan blogger!

 

6. Colorado:

Yup! I know It´s out of the top 5 but…

  • Brad Feld: In a mix between personal and professional thoughts Brad Feld has gained the respect of the VC and entrepreneur community not only in Colorado but also worldwide. Prolific, eclectic and sometimes controversial FeldThoughts is full of articles worth your time. Check out his last post on Software patents.
Area: Boulder

Firm: Foundry Group

Blog: Feld Thoughts

 

In a nutshell, in California, Massachusetts, New York and Colorado  the equation seems to work and a high levels of investment are accompanied by well-know blog leaders spreading the word out. On the contrary, Texas and Washington don’t follow the pattern! Yes, on the internet area leadership is global, but to certain extent VC investments and communities are still local and so they are their know-how and customs. Texan and Washingtonian bloggers or bloggers-to-be raise your voice! We avid readers, entrepreneurs, innovators, angels and investors want to know and are waiting for you!

 

About the Author: Sara Rodriguez is the new Associate Director of the Rockies Venture Club. Please consider welcoming her and introducing yourself when you see her at RVC events. 

 

 

If you really want to understand venture capital. Read venture capitalists’ blogs. Here is the most complete venture capitalist blogroll I’ve ever seen. Shamelessly stolen from National Venture Capital Association amazingly informative website.

 

VC Firm Name of VC Blog Name
Andreesen Horowitz Marc Andreesen pMARCA
Atlas Ventures Fred Destin Fred Destin’s Blog
Atlas Ventures Max Niederhofer Max Niederhofer
August Capital David Hornick VentureBlog
Ballast Point Ventures Navigating Venture
Battery Ventures The Whole Stack
Benchmark Capital Bill Gurley Above The Crowd
Bessemer Venture Partners David Cowen Who Has Time For This?
Bessemer Venture Partners Sarah Tavel Adventurista
BOLDStart Ventures Ed Sim BeyondVC
Canaan Partners Alok Mittal VentureWoods
Canaan Partners Izhar Shay’s StartupStadium
CommonAngels Chris Sheehan Early Stage Adventures
DFJ Esprit Nic Brisbourne The Equity Kicker
DFJ Portage Venture Partners Matt McCall VC Confidential
Draper Fisher Jurvetson Tim Draper The Riskmaster
Edison Ventures Edison Community Blog
Finaventures Rachid Sefrioui Rachid Sefrioui on Venture Capital
First Round Capital Josh Kopelman Red Eye VC
Flybridge Capital Partner Jeff Bussgang Seeing Both Sides
Flybridge Capital Partners David Aronoff Diary of A Geek VC
Flybridge Capital Partners Michael Greeley On The Flying Bridge
Flybridge Capital Partners Chip Hazard Hazard Lights
Flybridge Capital Partners Jon Karlen Venturing Forth
Flybridge Capital Partners Matthew Witheiler Bits of Cents
Foundry Group Jason Mendelson Mendelson’s Musings
Foundry Group Brad Feld Feld Thoughts
Foundry Group Ryan McIntyre McInBlog
Foundry Group Seth Levine VCAdventure
GGV Capital Jeff Richards, Partner 13 Hours to Think
GGV Capital Glenn Solomon, Partner Where Sand Hill Road Meets Wall Street
Grotech Ventures Don Rainey VC in DC
Highland Capital Partners Alex Taussig ataussig.com
Highland Capital Partners Bijan Salehizadeh TheBij.com
Highway Ventures Highway 12 Ventures Group Blog
Hummer Winblad Will Price Process & Iteration
Institutional Venture Partners (IVP) Jules Maltz better late than never
Intel Capital Christine Herron Christine.net
JumpStart Inc. JumpStart Blog
Levensohn Venture Partners Pascal Levensohn Pascal’s View
Lightspeed Venture Partners Lightspeed Venture Partners’ Blog
Matrix Partners David Skok For Entrepreneurs
Matrix Partners Antonio Rodriguez The Onda
Mayfield Fund Allen Morgan allensblog
Mohr Davidow Ventures David Feinleib vcdave
New Atlantic Ventures New Atlantic Ventures Blog
New Enterprise Associates NEA Blog
Okapi Ventures Mark Averitt OC VC
Point Judith Capital Lee Hower AgileVC
Polaris Venture Partners Ryan Spoon RyanSpoon.com
Polaris Venture Partners Mike Hirshland VC Mike’s Blog
Safeguard Scientifics Safeguard Scientifics’ Blog
Scale Venture Partners Rory O’Driscoll VC Matters
Trident Capital Evangelos Simoudis Trident Capital Blog
Union Square Ventures Fred Wilson AVC
Venrock David Beisel GenuineVC
Volition Capital Larry Cheng Thinking About Thinking

 

Guest post from Michael Price posted from www.connectedwest.org 

Email: michaelprice@connectedwest.org or call 720-515-7581

By Michael Price, Executive Director of the Coalition for a Connected West

Something pretty special has been brewing in Colorado recently.  It’s no secret that Boulder has become the next tech diamond in the rough—landing the top spot as a hot hub for new tech startups, other tech talent and private investment.  At Coalition for a Connected West, we sense a refreshed and serious commitment by Colorado’s lawmakers to work with the Coloradans to ensure the right regulations are in place to support expanding connectivity and flourishing innovation and private investment.  That’s why we took the opportunity to bring thought leaders, techies, and lawmakers together at the state Capitol to talk about hot legislative issues and business needs to create a more business- and tech- friendly environment in Colorado.

Last week, the Coalition for a Connected West joined the Colorado Technology Association (CTA) and Built In Denver to host “A Day at the Capitol.”  It was an opportunity to celebrate Colorado’s culture of innovation and establish a direct dialogue between policymakers and the technology community.  Nearly 200 tech leaders attended the event, which included some of Colorado’s top thought leaders in technology, all dedicated to creating connected and thriving business and tech communities in the state.

 

[Watch the  YOUTUBE VIDEO of CTA Day at the Capital Event]

Erik Mitisek, the newly announced CEO of the Colorado Technology Association and member of CCW’s advisory board, set the tone:

“Technology is the center-pivot that really is going to fuel innovation, efficiency and allow our state to be competitive in ways that we haven’t even thought of yet.”

On behalf of our partners, I moderated “Innovation and Growing Technology Companies,” a panel discussion featuring Colorado’s leading entrepreneurs and Wyoming State Senator Cale Case.  The engaging panel included Peter Hudson, CEO of iTriage; Tom Higley, CEO of Vokl; Brian Pontarelli, CEO of Inversoft; and Will McCollum, Denver General City Manager at Uber , who discussed the ingredients that lead to growth in the technology industry.

Photo credit: Inversoft
(Left to Right) Peter Hudson, CEO of iTriage; Michael Price, Executive Director of CCW; Tom Higley, CEO of Vokl; Brian Pontarelli, CEO of Inversoft; WY Sen. Cale Case; Will McCollum, Denver General City Manager at Uber.

The general consensus was that innovation needs space to thrive without burdensome regulations that could slow it down.  We also emphasized the need for Coloradans to be more involved in the policymaking process.  CCW is about generating a dialogue between the IT community and the policymakers that affect our lives and businesses.

Andrew Romanoff, former speaker of the Colorado House of Representatives, gave a presentation on how the legislative process works:

“I’m glad that you are taking the time to lift the lid on the Golden Dome and see what goes on underneath because I think it’s the only way, the best way to make this process as responsive and accountable and transparent as possible.”

During the event, the Colorado General Assembly was in the midst of the final days of the Legislative Session. Several important measures that would impact the technology community were being considered, including HB 13-1255.  The bill, authored by state Rep. Angela Williams, would create an environment conducive to encouraging investment in IP-based communications networks.  These next-generation networks are necessary to support the data-heavy traffic generated by devices like smartphones and tablets that have become central to our lives and our economy.  Similar legislation passed in Wyoming, which Sen. Case brought up during the panel discussion as a way that states with rural communities like Wyoming and Colorado could use to send a signal that they are open for tech business.

While the legislation passed unanimously in the State House (62-0), it is currently pending in the State Senate.  CCW and CTA are calling on Coloradans and members of the tech community to reach out to their senators and ask them to support the legislation.

Click here to take action!

CCW would like to thank CTA and Built In Denver for working with us to create a better future for Colorado and hosting a great event!

 

Dear reader,

This is the fifth of many blogposts in a series that I’m calling the Investor Pitch Deck Series. I am creating a post about each investor pitch slide, why it is important, the common errors, and how to communicate that you have what it takes to achieve your goals for this company.

Posts in this series

(note, this is NOT a suggested order for sides in your deck)

 


The mantra for this series is, “Above all, make sense.”


 

The Problem Slide

You can convey more information in the discussion of the problem than with any other single topic in your deck. Your company, and presumably your game-changing technology, product, or service was created to solve a pain point for someone. In your discussion of the problem, investors will be listening for hints that this problem is worth solving, that someone is willing to pay to have it solved, and that there are enough of those people out there to support a viable business.

Interestingly, your goal here isn’t to talk about the problem in detail.

If you have years of data that suggest nurses spend an alarming amount of time filling out paperwork and not enough time treating patients, then say so with a single graph. Then, move on to tell your audience how much time and money it costs one hospital, or a conglomerate of hospitals, or the whole nation each year for nurses to get their paperwork done. These staggering numbers will support the notion that you are dealing with a potentially ginormous problem.

The fundamental point of your problem slide is to illustrate that you are able to solve a huge problem that will be supported by customers with the money to pay for your solution.

 


Cringe Factors

Cringe Factor #1 –  You go into detail on the limits of the current technology.

Why this makes us cringe: This would be appropriate in an industry specific talk where everyone in the room can follow the oh-so obvious problems associated with the use of a reversed biased p+-n junction. But in mixed company, you must speak plainly or you risk losing important people.

How to do it right: Stick with an eight grade understanding of your industry technology when speaking to a mixed audience. Think PBS special. Even though you might be surrounded by very smart people with PhDs, MBAs, and MDs, they probably have not kept up with the fundamentals of your specific industry and will be a little overwhelmed with an in depth tech talk. Further, the point of your investor pitch is not to discuss the technology, but to discuss the deal. Remember, everything you talk about in an investor pitch comes back to money.

 

Cringe Factor #2 – The problem is oddly specific

Why this makes us cringe: If you solve a pain point for for a very small group of people, then your business seems limited from the start.

How to do it right: If your technology helps a small group of people (women over 6’4″ tall who drive small cars), then you will have to show that your company is actually a platform for future technologies that all add up to a large target market. The Problem is a fundamental basis for your business plan, but a small initial market doesn’t have to sink your company. It’s the messaging that is important. When the long limbed ladies represent an initial market and the rest of all American car divers represent your larger target market, you will be fine.

 

Cringe Factor #3 – Your technology is in search of a problem

Why this makes us cringe: This is a notoriously common problem with products that come out of universities. The research is so cutting-edge that the technology created actually precedes the need for itself. If you invent a hammer, but the world has not yet invented nails, you will have some trouble selling that hammer.

How to do it right: Most technologies can have alternate uses. You will have to identify a marketable use for your technology (or a subset of your technology). Look for big markets with a lot of money involved. You will absolutely have to call people or meet with the folks experiencing the pain point before you can claim that your technology will help them. Really understand the problem before you go forward with developing the technology into a product.

 

Cringe Factor #4 – The problem is big, but poorly supported by capital.

Why this makes us cringe: There are very large problems in this world that are not well funded. Clean water is a big one. Poverty, child abuse, malnutrition, etc. Unfortunately, the biggest problems in this world do not have payers attached to them.

How to do it right: You must show that someone is wiling to pay for the solution that you put forth. If your company cannot show that someone will pay for the product or service you provide, then you cannot claim to be able to return money back to the investors. Instead of investors, you should seek grants and philanthropists. Problems with a significant social impact do not have to be poorly funded. If you are creative, you can find a way to many many problems lucrative enough to pursue.

 


 

The problem slide should most likely be broken into two or three slides that handle the three sides of the problem. The slide to the right helps us understand the fundamental safety importance of identification in a hospital setting.

  • Outline the problem so the audience gets it
  • Show data supporting the size, extent, or number of people affected by the problem
  • List a few financial figures suggesting the potential return on investment for the customer to stop doing things the old way and switch to your product.

 

 

Article by Nicole Gravagna, PhD, Director of Operations for the Rockies Venture Club as part of a series on the elements of an investor pitch deck. The next in the series is the Customer ROI Slide.

 

First Post by Sara Rodriguez-Lopez

For those (many) who don’t know me, I moved a few months ago to Denver where I began to volunteer at the Rockies Venture Club. After only 3 months I met a lot of interesting people and learned about so many different things that my head was ready to explode!

I earned my Master’s in entrepreneurship and I did start my own company in the past, but it was at RVC where I got to see, for the first time, how Angel investors work. Eventually, I thought “Ok, I got it! I’m starting to see the big picture” until Nicole Gravagna invited me to Pat Linden’s Anti-dilution class!

Anti-dilution, now that’s tricky stuff!

A couple of days before the class I started reading about anti-dilution… oh boy!!! Full ratchet, narrow weighted average, broad weighted average, pay to play…This stuff really made my head spin…  At the end, I think I ended up having a “more or less” clear picture about the anti-dilution provisions… So, here I am writing down what I learned (just the basics… very basic) and hoping this blog-post would help someone out!

 

What is dilution?

Dilution is the subsequent sale of shares of stock at a price per share less than that paid by the preceding investor. Therefore, to protect their rights investors usually include an anti-dilution clause in the term-sheet.

If you are an investor you may be wondering now: why when the shares are sold at a higher price it’s not considered dilution if my ownership percentage will be reduced?  Because, although it is true your ownership is being diluted, the increment on the share price implies that the valuation of the company went up. As a result, the overall value of your investment increased and you should be happy. Cool! First thing clear!

 

What mechanisms can be put in place to avoid investment dilution?

There are two main formulas:

A. Weighted Average Formula: is the most common approach to anti-dilution protection and calculates the price considering the price and the amount of money previously raised as well as the price and amount of money being raised in the subsequent dilutive financing.

There are two primary variations of this formula that are basically differentiated by what constitutes “issued and outstanding common stock”

a.1) Broad based: the term “issued and outstanding common stock” includes all shares of stock outstanding, common and future stocks.

  • For Founders: This is the anti-dilution clause more “company friendly” and also the most customizable one, many investors will agree upon this formula.

a.2) Narrow based: the term issued and outstanding common stock” includes only the common stock issuable upon conversion.

  • For Investors: Narrow based is the most beneficial for you since this formula provides a higher conversion rate than the broad based.

B. Full Ratchet: “when the conversion price of the preferred stock outstanding prior to such financing is reduced to a price equal to the price per share paid in such a dilutive financing” or in other words: if you bought a share per $1 and the new price is $0.5 the conversion rate is two. For each of the “old” shares you get two of the “new ones”. Under this formula it doesn’t matter if the company raises $20,000 or $200,000,000

  • For Founders: awful, no matter how you look at it you don’t want to be here (it seriously jeopardizes your ability to raise money from new investors).
  • For Investors: it is a great deal and the most protective clause you can get, but be careful in this way you can lock down the company to future investors.

 

Is there something the company can do to mitigate the cons of an anti-dilution provision?

One of the most common clauses that companies usually include in the term sheet in order to protect their rights is the “Pay To Play”  clause that provides anti-dilution protection only for investors who will participate in the next dilutive finance. With this formula the founders incentive their investors in keeping on investing in the company and therefore, avoid some the major problems of the Full Ratchet (It can also be incorporated in the Weighted Average Formula).

 

Is there something else that helps reducing the dilution risk?

Yes, having the “right valuation” can be, for both the entrepreneur and the early investor, the best measure against dilution. Why is that? Well, the answer comes easy, having a feet-on-the-ground valuation will avoid the issuance of future stock at a lower price as well as will save money in lawyers exercising crazy clauses in crazy terms sheets. I know, valuation is hard but definitely something worth spending some time on.

 

There isn’t a better contract than the one based on trust and transparency

Founders: the Investor is now part of your team (and you aren’t giving anything away).

Investors: the founders love the company and more than anyone they want the company to succeed… they don’t want to run with your money away!

Guys, let’s work together!!

 

So…I started writing this post for my own sake, it isn’t perfect and it doesn’t cover all the points but I think now I really understand what is anti-dilution and hopefully you do too.  Now time for a “fat tire”! Hope you enjoyed your reading 🙂

 

Further information at: http://www.stanford.edu/class/e145/2008_fall/materials/The%20Venture%20Capital%20Anti-Dilution.pdf

If you came to the Colorado Capital Conference last October you may have seen Governor Hickenlooper’s keynote address. Hick’s good friend Steve Foster gave the introduction. At the time, Steve Foster was the CEO of the Colorado Technology Association. Steve Foster stepped down earlier this year to take over as head of GTRI. Now, after a short executive search, Erik Mitisek has been named the new head of CTA.

Mitisek has been associated with the startup world in Colorado for a long time for such a young man. Most recently, he’s been a driving force for grass-roots operations such as Startup Colorado, Denver Startup Week, and BuiltIn Denver.

This news of Mikisek as the head of CTA should put your mind at ease for a bunch of reasons. First of all, the CTA is the largest and most influential technology association in the state. Aside from networking and business-connecting activities, CTA works to guide public policies that affect technology businesses in Colorado. Since technology moves so quickly, it’s very hard for legislators to keep up with all the new opportunities on the horizon. Laws can hold back startups and larger businesses without meaning to. CTA opens the line of communication so that our state legislature paves the way for technology instead of standing in the way.

One of the biggest issues that faces Colorado is that of attracting companies to Colorado and retaining them once they grow. CTA supports the policies and initiatives that draw national attention to our state as a place where businesses thrive. By educating home-grown STEM talent in Colorado, we foster the ecosystem of growing technology companies. CTA is also highly supportive of initiatives that improve access to capital which is something we think about all day here at Rockies Venture Club.

Mitisek is a highly capable leader who genuinely cares about businesses in Colorado. He has an impressive resume including two stints as CEO (Next Great Place, and Claremont Information Systems) and was recently named one of Colorado’s 25 Most Influential Young Professionals by ColoradoBiz Magazine. Don’t even bother being impressed yet because this is only the beginning.

On Mitisek’s watch, CTA will become fundamentally integrated into the fabric of Denver. He will do exactly what he does best–connect grass-roots everyman needs with the administrative efforts of the state government and non-government community leaders. He will help focus the funding power of local foundations who state in their missions a desire to support economic development.

Most of all, Erik Mitisek will remind us that technology is not just for the proverbial software engineer. We all carry a powerful computer in our pockets everyday. We all need to understand how technology can help our businesses market products better. We all need digital security and data storage for our personal information, photos, address book, and recipes. We are all technologists. There’s no more denying it.

Write your well-wishes to Eric Mitisek (or the tasks you want him to handle first) in the comments and I’ll pass them on to him.

More coverage here:

 

Article by Nicole Gravagna, Director of Operations for the Rockies Venture Club.

 

 

An original guest post by Jay Holman, Principal of Venture to Market

101010Denver

Update: Get information about 10.10.10 on 101010denver.com

10.10.10 will Bring Big Problems to Denver

Entrepreneurs have a unique ability to see opportunity in the problems others face, and they are irresistibly drawn in by the desire to create, and sell, solutions to those problems. This is the guiding principle behind the upcoming 10.10.10 event in Denver, which will bring 10 would-be CEO’s to town for 10 days to brainstorm solutions to 10 big problems. The goal is not just to see if participants can come up with feasible solutions to the problems, but to go beyond that by turning one or more of those solutions into successful startups led by members of the group.

The brainchild of Denver entrepreneur and Vokl founder Tom Higley, the 10.10.10 is an experiment to see whether the creative genius that leads to startup success can be reproduced in a laboratory environment. Along the way, the event will highlight the positive business climate and culture of the Denver area, which was already given a boost recently when the SBE Council named Colorado one of the 10 most entrepreneur-friendly states.

The 10.10.10 is not a business plan competition; instead, it is about collaborative business plan creation. When CEO level entrepreneurs apply to participate, they will identify a problem they’d like to discuss with the other participants. They won’t suggest a solution in their applications; those suggestions will come during of a 10-day working session in Denver during which all 10 participants work on all 10 problems. If a feasible path to a solution emerges for one or more of the problems, it will be developed into a business plan.

The focus will be on big problems, as bigger problems lead to bigger opportunities. Since a primary goal for this exercise is to start one or more profitable businesses, applicants will need to provide proof that large companies or groups of consumers are willing to pay for a solution to the problem the applicant describes. That means charity projects are out (sorry Jimmy Carter, but if all goes well the participants will be in touch after their exits).

So, will it work? Like any experiment, or any startup for that matter, 10.10.10 has its risks. 10 days is not a long time to come up with a solution to a major problem, and participants won’t have much of an opportunity to gather additional information to flush out the details of their proposed solutions. Lots of problems seem easy to solve until you look at the details; hence the ubiquitous pivot.

However, there is something to be said for taking a step back, putting your head together with a group of smart people with access to capital, and looking for good opportunities that others have missed (I refuse to use the term “low hanging fruit”). How many times have you asked yourself, “why didn’t I think of that?” after you see someone strike it rich for rebranding off-the-shelf paint as liquid paper or repurposing a small box as a humane mouse-trap? There are so many solvable problems out there that I think a group of successful entrepreneurs with resources should be embarrassed if they don’t knock a few off and make a bundle in the process. Just don’t forget Jimmy on your way home from the bank.

Jay Holman is Principal of Venture to Market LLC, a Boulder based consultancy providing go to market services for new ventures in the cleantech industry.

101010 Denver 101010Denver