In light of the recent SCOTUS ruling, we thought we would talk about an economic model that helps us understand discrimination and voting with your dollar. How your preferences affect the price you’re willing to pay for a product or service directly correlates to a business’s ability to stay open. You wouldn’t go to a burger joint that was dirty or had terrible service if the burger place a block away had the same prices and was clean or had better service, and we can explain it with economics.

Bakers Green and Blue

Anyone who has sat through Economics 101 knows this graph. It’s a basic supply and demand chart with two bakeries and the market of buyers. Bakery Green is charging Y more than Blue Bakery for reason A. In a normal scenario, Green must lower their price or go out of business as Blue takes all the business they can handle (Blue could, in theory, raise prices to match Green, but that model gets complicated as we factor in behavioral economics and the price elasticity of demand.). In the traditional, basic model, Green just has higher costs. Maybe the owner wants a higher salary, maybe the business had to take out loans at a higher rate, with the result being costs that are higher. If that price is as low as Green can charge, then Green will eventually go out of business.

Now let’s abstract a little. What if reason the price is difference, Y, is not a dollar amount? Common examples of this would be that Green is further from town than Blue, or perhaps Blue is able to keep the line short while Green has a 30 minute wait. In this case, we’ll say that Y is difference in beliefs between you and Green Bakery’s management. In some cases business will fail slowly as a result of this type of disagreement as social norms shift, while in some cases firms go out of business rather quickly. For some customers, Green will not have this additional cost Y and will cost the same as Blue. For some customers, Green’s preferences could even align with theirs, adding to business, but so long as a critical mass of Green’s existing customers have beliefs and a demand function like the gray one above, Green will lose business to Blue and be forced to shutter their doors. In this case, hinging on the critical mass of disagreement, the free market at work will reduce business for Green until the day they no longer breakeven.

We see a similar story in the allocation of venture capital. Plenty of research has shown that women executives and female CEOs outperform the indexes of male dominated companies. Women are managing to be a better bet than men by as much as a factor of three, and yet they only make up about 6.5% of Fortune 500 CEOs and only 20% of VC deals, or 2% of all venture capital. They drive additional value, outgrowing their male counterparts by 63% in the case of First Round Capital. In other words, women founders cost VCs less, earn them more, and yet, they still don’t receive equal funding. This is a lot like our bakers Blue and Green. Blue is the VC funds putting capital towards women founders and seeing results. Green is the funds that follow the industry standards and miss out on the returns of investing in female founders. Angels and venture capitalists are suffering a huge opportunity cost in not servicing the demands of female founders.

Various reports of discrimination in the community help to explain some of this. In some benevolent cases, discrimination occurs as an accident, as Katrina Lake outlines in conversation with NPR, pointing out that many VCs have pitch requirements that could exclude the growing industry of so-called mompreneurs. The offices are highly male dominated, with only 6% of VCs being women as recently as 2016.

Compare these averages to the Rockies Venture Club. Of our 31 portfolio companies, over half star female founders running companies ranging from tech solutions for kitchens to FinTech answers for any early stage startup. Enter RVC’s Women’s Investor Network, or WIN for short. Headed up by Director Barbara Bauer, WIN was founded to increase the number of active female Angel’s working with RVC. Something Barbara has identified, and highlights regularly at RVC events and talks, is the need to fund female entrepreneurs to make sure that women have the capital and the experience to be informed Angels. As an experienced entrepreneur with a background and education in science and engineering, Barbara represents the best of the best to lead RVC and the venture and Angel communities as a whole towards a better, more diverse future.

Know someone interested in working with Barbara as a WINtern? Have them send a resume to info@rockiesventureclub.org!

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *