Top-10 Twitter Action Tips – Don’t Read If You Don’t Get Twitter or Care To

Written by Tom Cross @techtionary

I gave a talk on Twitter at Rockies Venture Club Hyperaccelerator. This is a week-long effort to help startups understand everything they need to do to not fail or at least not fail as fast. I do the Twitter for @rockiesventure which topped 10K (click on image to follow RVC) this week. The reaction from the audience went from skeptical to being annoyed at even the idea. Now I can’t change their hearts and minds about Twitter but maybe, just maybe get them to understand marketing in terms that most of them were male – sports. Coaches of nearly all sports use “playbooks” to guide their team hopefully to victory. There are hundreds of plays like marketing plans, coaches and marketing leaders try as many as they can. Some work though many don’t because the other team (like customers) change their mind, are fickle or just don’t play the way you want them to play. In addition, sports teams like customers change every year or even everyday with new ones being added and old ones retiring changing the game landscape (marketing) in ways no one can understand. One must also realize that any playbook or marketing plan needs to change as often as customers do. In the end, my class was successful from my perspective as like President Trump is doing with Twitter allowing companies to connect directly to their customers and supporters.

easy

not easy

Here is the summary of the slides below –

  • If you still ask “why” Twitter, the answer is both easy and hard.
  • The easy answer is – it is the new way to connect with your customers and provide customer service as they don’t complain by just calling you they increasingly complain via Twitter with the famous hashtag #fail which can go viral.
  • If you think it is just for promoting your corporate blogs and blather, you are likely missing out on how customers really feel about you, this is the hard answer because customers just buy from someone else.

Toms’ Top-10

Use as a guideline but the must-haves are 1-strong thought leadership, 2-stronger calls-to-action and 3-persistent constant delivery.

1 – #1 it is a social network, not a broadcast network, people want to feel listened to not just talked down to.

2 – Write compelling customer-centric “thought leadership” guiding them on ways to improves their lives, not just about your solutions or views.

3 – Write compelling CTA-calls to action to get them to not just listen but act.

4 – Engage-engage and engage more with others not just post your own “selfies” though as often or always add a pic, gif, or video to your post.

5 – Like exercise do it daily and it’s a marathon, not a sprint – no just once and done and certainly not use tools. While stair master can help with exercise, you still have to walk-the-walk yourself.

6 – Lift all boats, helping others helps you.

7 – Cross post on other platforms – realize your customer may be elsewhere.

9 – Integrate all website content and have an overall thoughtful content in all formats and platforms.

9 – Use an EDCAL-editorial calendar to manage and coordinate content over the year.

10 – Remember followers also have followers and so engaged with all.

I don’t pretend to have all the answers or know-it-all. My mom gave me a business card a long time ago and it said, “if you think you know what’s going on, you’re probably full of sh–.” Alas, I do help clients grow their Twitter presence and believe it works it if you work it right like above. Thought leadership, CTA-call-to-action and constant promotion works for Starbucks, McDonald’s and others. Even Google is advertising now as they want to expand their own piece of the swamp.

Here are a few slides from the presentation and click on any for the complete presentation. If you like I will walk you through it or at least answer any question if you email me and we can setup a time to talk on the tele or Skype. I have proven clients and references or if you prefer you can also contact @evankirstel he can help you as well.

rvc2

rvc

 

 

 

Marketing Dilemma: Time and Capital is Key

The marketing dilemma in todays start-up world can be defined by the need for capital to increase marketing, but also the need for marketing to gain capital. Read more

Impact Investing Night 2016

Impact Investing Night 2016: Keynote Speaker

Each Watson semester is an intensive fifteen week program in which scholars receive weekly mentorship and coaching sessions, free international legal support (through a partnership with Thomson Reuters), training in the hard skills and frameworks to take their ideas to the next level, and a community of peers that will last far beyond Watson. We aim to be the Olympic training ground for next generation change makers and you can expect the experience to be both challenging and fun. Below are four key elements of each semester. Speaker Eric Glustrom, Watson University’s founder, will be discussing how to measure the impact of an investment.

dBMEDx is a medical device company waging war against health-care acquired infections . We recently launched the BBS RevolutionTM, a next generation bladder scanner that battles both CAUTI and patient-to-patient transmission while delivering the quadruple aim of better outcomes, lower costs, more satisfied patients and more empowered providers. We are seeking growth capital to support our efforts to exit in 3 – 5 years. We have FDA clearance, CE mark, 5 patents and we’re generating revenue! Learn More Here

Intuitive Innovations delivers products and services for older adults that improve quality of life, independence and safety. Products combine technology and universal design that’s high tech on the inside, intuitive on the outside, and fashionable. Intuitive’s first product, the I Love You Band (I?U) comprises a watch, a PERS (personal emergency response system), and multimodal communication capabilities which collectively improve connectedness while providing peace of mind to loved ones. Learn More Here

Revolution Systems develops and sells the Revolution, a sorting line that is configurable, scale-able, self balancing and upgrade-able. Incumbent suppliers offer specially designed systems on a project basis that are elegant, but expensive and rigid. Revolution Systems’ focus on local communities and businesses, has resulted in an affordable system that can grow and adapt as the needs of the program change. Focus on smaller markets and creation of a flexible product allows us to achieve scale more easily than our competitors, reducing product cost to put recycling within reach of small communities and businesses. Learn More Here

Wave Solar is making an Impact with our Solar Steam Engine. A complete energy system for your home or small commercial building that provides electricity, heat, hot water and air conditioning, all from solar thermal panels plus natural gas. Given the back-up energy, the system will work in bad weather without storage, or work all night long as a back-up generator if the power grid is down. One percent of our systems will be installed for free in schools in third world countries. These systems will be reconfigured to purify dirty water into drinking water, provide a refridgation for a school, and run off garbage as a back-up energy source. Learn More Here

This event is available to be watched via livestream!

Why Venture Capital may not be a Silver Bullet for Startup Funding.

alternatives to venture captialVenture capital is a great solution to many startups’ finance problems, but it’s often not the best solution and, even when it is the best solution, it often works best as a part of a suite of financial solutions rather than a silver bullet that solves everything in one move.

Venture capital, including angel investment, is the most expensive type of capital out there. So why would so many people be intent on going for the most expensive option when others exist?  A typical VC is looking for a return of 60% or greater on their investment – compounded annually.  That means that at three years they want 4X. At five years it’s 10X. At seven years it’s 25X and at 10 years it’s a whopping 100X return on investment.  All of these are 60% compounding returns.

Venture capitalists need big returns to help offset their big risks.  About half of their investments might result in a complete loss of invested capital, so they need to have investments capable of being home runs in order to pay for all the losers.

There are different ways to create a capital strategy for startups who want to both grow fast, but minimize dilution and reduce the cost of capital.  Rather than using just one very expensive type of capital for their startup, they may use a suite of different sources that are appropriate to the phase of development.

Early Stage – Before VC

Early stage companies have many sources of capital available to them, even if they don’t know it.

SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research), Advanced Industries Proof of Concept and many other federal and state grants are available for early research and proof of concept.  Often these are expensive research projects whose risk is much greater than can be justified even for venture capital.  Startups that use these sources of funds can increase their value and decrease their technical risk without any dilution to the founders.

Another source of early stage funding comes from specialty service providers.  Attorneys and CPAs will often defer compensation or work out an equity deal in exchange for early work.  You might be able to get your patent filed for zero out of pocket costs using this kind of deal.

In Revenue

Companies that are in revenue have lots of new non-VC sources of funding available.  Consider accounts receivable finance to cover your rapidly growing need of cash to carry AR through thirty to ninety days before it gets paid.  Some lenders will even lend on purchase orders so you can get the capital you need to buy the components you need to build your product.

If your product is a SaaS (Software as a Service) platform, then your cost of goods is going to be people, not product.  Consider using Equity Compensation for all or part of your payment to your developers.  There are both individuals and development companies who will swap a portion of their compensation for equity.  You’ll need to have a good handle on your valuation, but why not give equity directly to your developers rather than give it to VCs who give you cash which you then turn around and give to developers?

So, there are many more types of finance options available to you than can be described here.  The main point to remember is that you are not required to use just one mode of funding.  Look at all of the available sources and design a suite of solutions that provides the best solution to your situation.

To learn more about how to use creative funding along with venture capital, or instead of it, consider attending the RVC’s Colorado Capital Conference November 15-16, 2016.  If you’re not in Denver on those days, you can register to participate in the conference via live-feed.

More information and registration at www.coloradocapitalconference.org

Colorado Capital Conference

 

 

 

Peter Adams

 

Peter is Executive Director of the Rockies Venture Club, Managing Director of the Rockies Venture Fund and teaches in the Colorado StaVenture Capital for Dummieste University MBA Program.  Peter is co-author of Venture Capital for Dummies, (John Wiley & Sons 2013) Available at Amazon, Barnes and Noble and your local book store.

 

 

 

Valuing Startup Valuations – Webcast

Understanding startup valuations is often a complex and murky process.  Peter gives you great insights on what you think you are worth, what you are really worth and also importantly gives you guidance as to understand valuations from the startup to exit.

Valuations

Valuations

The latest addition to our educational webinar series, covering startup valuation, is here…
Peter Adams, Managing Director of Rockies Venture Fund and Rockies Venture Club, presented “Understanding Startup Valuation”, covering the fundamentals of valuations and tools entrepreneurs can use when developing their own models.

After founding/co-founding and investing in multiple successful startups, Peter shares what he’s learned – don’t miss out on watching the replay if you haven’t done so yet!
Preview of topics in “Understanding Startup Valuation”:

How to determine valuation on an early-stage, pre-revenue company
Why traditional valuation methodologies don’t work for early stage companies
Why an exit strategy is required in order to conduct a valuation exercise
Valuation methodologies that CAN be used as part of your model
Tools and resources you can use in developing your valuation model

 

Attractive Pitch

The first pitch to investors is in many ways the company’s first date. It is the investors first experience with you and your company.  The end goal is to receive a second date. Yet, with many top notch pitches coming through it takes more than just a solid proof of concept and innovative idea to gain interest. Read more

Top Questions Angel Investors Will Ask Entrepreneurs

It’s highly important for entrepreneurs to be prepared when they pitch their startup company to angel investors. Before the pitch, entrepreneurs should prepare by anticipating questions angel investors might ask. If you don’t have thoughtful and reasonable answers, it will definitely reduce the likelihood of an entrepreneurs company getting funded. We’ve prepared a list of key questions angel investors might ask during a pitch.

Read more

SEC Adopts Rules to Permit Crowdfunding

Rockies Venture Club is pleased to share the news that more than three years after passing the JOBS act, the SEC has adopted new rules to permit crowdfunding.  This means that those who could not previously qualify as an “accredited investor” with $1 million or more in assets or $200K in annual earnings or more, can now participate in early stage investing.

Read more

Why Angel Investors Don’t Require Private Placement Memorandums (PPM) any More

Many years ago almost all companies raising money used a PPM (Private Placement Memorandum) as the document to put the deal together.  The PPM typically consists of three or four parts including 1) A summary business plan that describes what the business is and how it is going to execute its plan 2) Risks involved in investing in the deal. 3) A term sheet that describes the terms of the deal and 4) the capitalization table showing existing shareholders, types of shares, percentages owned, etc.  The PPM was the selling document and, when signed, constituted the completion of the deal. Read more

Ten Reasons to Attend the Cannabis Capital Summit 2.0

Maybe you’ve been thinking of registering for this year’s Cannabis Capital Summit and wanted some reasons to say “yes”.  Well, here’s what you’ve been waiting for! Read more